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Mike Rowe on Work, Plain and Simple
Old 03-30-2009, 10:51   #1
Razor
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Mike Rowe on Work, Plain and Simple

Some very interesting observations on work, epiphany and the importance of the trades:

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/m...irty_jobs.html
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Old 03-30-2009, 11:20   #2
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I listened to this a couple weeks ago. Very interesting to hear his perspective on work and its change throughout the years. Especially since he has had the unique experience of doing a lot of the jobs most people wouldn't dare give a chance.

Great Post.
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Old 03-30-2009, 20:49   #3
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I often dont grow too fond of TV folk....Mike seems to be a down to earth guy.


I looked around a little and found this one

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/j...d_success.html

The Coach, what more can I say. I very much liked the story of the umpire with one 'I'.

Last edited by sapper; 03-30-2009 at 20:52.
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Old 03-30-2009, 21:44   #4
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I've been in the construction industry for over 14 years now. Yeah, I'm an engineer, but I owe the largest measure of my success to getting out in the field with the people who actually build what I dream up, and learning what works and what doesn't. What I've noticed over this short time span, is that every year, there are less and less people willing to do the complicated, difficult, and sometimes dirty work. The pool of true tradesmen/craftsmen is drying up. The twin capabilities of intelligence and a hard work ethic is becoming a rarity. Maybe that's why I admire the QP's so much. They have the inherent qualities that appear to be dwindling in general society, at least from my POV.

Thanks for the post, it made my day
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Old 03-30-2009, 22:40   #5
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Originally Posted by aegisnavy View Post
I've been in the construction industry for over 14 years now. Yeah, I'm an engineer, but I owe the largest measure of my success to getting out in the field with the people who actually build what I dream up, and learning what works and what doesn't. What I've noticed over this short time span, is that every year, there are less and less people willing to do the complicated, difficult, and sometimes dirty work. The pool of true tradesmen/craftsmen is drying up. The twin capabilities of intelligence and a hard work ethic is becoming a rarity. Maybe that's why I admire the QP's so much. They have the inherent qualities that appear to be dwindling in general society, at least from my POV.

Thanks for the post, it made my day
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Old 03-31-2009, 05:46   #6
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Dirty Jobs is one of the only shows I care to watch on TV

I've always gotten the sense that Mike Rowe was a solid guy

thanks for the video
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Old 03-31-2009, 06:22   #7
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Work is what built this country.

My Dad was a master carpenter for over 30 years. He designed and personally built the house I grew up in. He bought the land, moved a trailer out there, had a well drilled, built a septic tank system, dug the foundation and built the forms for the house/garage, mixed and poured the concrete, put in the plumbing and wiring, laid the brick and built the fireplace, put in the windows and furnace, roofed it with cedar shakes, stuccoed it, etc. It took him - with the help of a neighbor - two years to complete and he paid for it all as he built it. He and the neighbor helped each other build their two houses and barns. The garage was finished first and had a sink, toilet and shower. We moved into the garage and then into the house as it was finished. The flooring is tongue and groove 1/2" thick maple from a JC Penney store which was built in the 1920s and torn down in 1951, and beautiful. The house is still a modern looking ranch and solid as a rock.

When he was the foreman of the construction company he worked for, I used to watch my Dad in the evenings poring over blueprints of construction projects and refiguring things which the architect had designed but were unworkable. He had a set of Audel's manuals he used which literally taught you how to build anything - if you could read and had the desire to learn. He had a desk at the back of the living room made from a 7' oaken door so he could roll out the blueprints for reading/editing. My oldest son, an environmental chemical engineer, now uses the desk in his office.

My Dad was wiry and had worked all his life, and after he retired as a carpenter, he continued to farm with my brother until his death in 2001.

The pic is my Mom and Dad standing behind the house in 1953 (kitchen window behind Dad's head).

His lesson to us (my 2 brothers and myself) was that we could do about anything if we really wanted to do it and we went about it in the right way. I've tried to pass those same lessons on to my sons.

Richard's $.02
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Old 03-31-2009, 06:36   #8
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Mike Rowe is one of the few guys that I think are real on TV today. I love watching Dirty Jobs when I am in the states. I drives my mother crazy but she likes reality TV so you know where she is in life.

I enjoy listening to him talk and most people think he is not educated because of what his show does but he is and listening to this video drives the point home how well educated he is.

Thanks for the post.
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Old 03-31-2009, 06:54   #9
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Great video and great web site. I thoroughly enjoy hearing some of the "out of the box" thinkers that excel in their particular field.

Hartzco
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This is how I learned also...
Old 03-31-2009, 08:51   #10
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Thumbs up This is how I learned also...

Quote:
When he was the foreman of the construction company he worked for, I used to watch my Dad in the evenings poring over blueprints of construction projects and refiguring things which the architect had designed but were unworkable. He had a set of Audel's manuals he used which literally taught you how to build anything - if you could read and had the desire to learn.
I'd go to the FOGs of each trade and they'd sit me down with the blueprints and explain every little detail then; they'd have me work on that particular page of the blueprint.

After some time, you could actually look at blueprints and envision it in 3D. It's a skill that I currently use when assessing clinics here now.

BTW...there was a "right of passage" you had too endure in order to gain the old-timers' respect. Pouring and finishing concrete was a bitch, 4x8 3/4" plywood ain't light and the various other things they'd have me do sucked!

I SURVIVED!

Stay safe.
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Old 03-31-2009, 09:47   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guy View Post
I'd go to the FOGs of each trade and they'd sit me down with the blueprints and explain every little detail then; they'd have me work on that particular page of the blueprint.

After some time, you could actually look at blueprints and envision it in 3D. It's a skill that I currently use when assessing clinics here now.

BTW...there was a "right of passage" you had too endure in order to gain the old-timers' respect. Pouring and finishing concrete was a bitch, 4x8 3/4" plywood ain't light and the various other things they'd have me do sucked!

I SURVIVED!

Stay safe.
Guy,
I've seen pictures of some of the projects you've done. You didn't just survive...you excelled.

Razor,
Thank you for posting this.

The trend I've seen in public education, at least here in Oregon, is to separate out the students between those who would work with their minds or their hands.
If you are "hands" this used to mean going to shop class to learn how to pound a nail, weld some steel or wrench on a car.
Not much was expected of these students as they were placed in the holding pens of the shops while the schools real energy was dedicated towards getting the rest into a college.

Now the the shop classes are mostly eliminated and few exist. Students are being taught that it is sub-class to get their hands dirty.

Here is the big mistake the public schools have made, it is not understanding you have to work with both your hands and mind. Where do they think the hard workers who drive this nation come from?

Where do the real innovators and entrepreneurs in industry come from?

Anyone hear the story of some old boy in Italy named Ferruccio Lamborghini?
He ran "Lamborghini Trattori", they made farm tractors and still do. Now the Lamborghini name is associated with something that rolls a little faster all because Ferruccio decided to turn his skills in another direction. I'd bet he's gotten his hands dirty once or twice.

As has already been stated in this thread, the United States of America was built by those who worked hard and got dirty and I will add, using their brains and hands.

Thank you Mike Rowe.
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Old 03-31-2009, 10:06   #12
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Quote:
Now the the shop classes are mostly eliminated and few exist. Students are being taught that it is sub-class to get their hands dirty.

Here is the big mistake the public schools have made, it is not understanding you have to work with both your hands and mind. Where do they think the hard workers who drive this nation come from?
One of the main reasons I enjoy teaching in the school in which I teach is that it is the "vocational magnet" school for our district. We have students pursuing careers in culinary, cosmetology, carpentry, auto mechanics and body work, computer technology, floral design, and many others. Most of these students are focused and goal-oriented. We also require a higher degree of academic performance than our sister schools - and get cooperation from the students' CTE teacher in achieving this. My previous job was in a school such as this one, and I wouldn't want to teach anywhere else.

In regard to Mike Rowe, I always told my daughters that there were NO "demeaning" jobs. People in your workplace or supervisours could demean you, but the work you did held the dignity that you brought with you to it - no matter what it was.
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Old 03-31-2009, 11:00   #13
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What a great thread.

Richard, your dad reminds me of my grandfather who passed away in 2000. He was a tanker in WWII and owned a heavy construction company until about 1989, when he retired. He was always hard at work. I miss him immensely. I guess I can “blame” him for the construction bug in my blood. It led me into this field rather than into other fields of electrical engineering.

Bill, I grew up in Oregon, and I noticed that trend when I was in high school there (back in the mid ‘80’s). These days, a friend of mine that I grew up with teaches classes at the junior high school in Tualatin, that are a combination of design, hands-on building, and integration of high-tech. It restores my faith in the Oregon public schools, a little. (Sounds similar to what ZonieDiver is doing). He is also a hands-on Scoutmaster who spends his free time building canoes with his Scouts every year for the 50-miler. Mike Rowe reminds me a lot this friend.

Thanks to all those who survived and are passing on the ethics of hard work to the next generation. We all need it.

Now back to less posting and more searching/reading. Thanks again.
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Last edited by aegisnavy; 03-31-2009 at 11:03.
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Old 03-31-2009, 16:11   #14
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ZonieDiver,
Great news what you do. That gives me hope.

aegisnavy,
Thanks for the information. That also gives me hope.

I've been told by high school counselors that there is no need to encourage a student to think about learning how to be a machinist because that's a dying trade. Where the h*ll do they think those who will end up driving the outfits that are both innovative and productive come from? That's why I wrote about the Italian tractor maker.
My opinion is having other countries do all our food growing and manufacturing is a special form of treason or at the least exposes us to other problems.
Mike Rowe shows us there is still some America left.
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Old 03-31-2009, 16:21   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harsey View Post
ZonieDiver,
Great news what you do. That gives me hope.

aegisnavy,
Thanks for the information. That also gives me hope.

I've been told by high school counselors that there is no need to encourage a student to think about learning how to be a machinist because that's a dying trade. Where the h*ll do they think those who will end up driving the outfits that are both innovative and productive come from? That's why I wrote about the Italian tractor maker.
My opinion is having other countries do all our food growing and manufacturing is a special form of treason or at the least exposes us to other problems.
Mike Rowe shows us there is still some America left.
A friend of mine stayed at an "agri-turismo" in Italy last year and brought me a picture of a Lamborghini <sp> tractor. Waaaay cool!
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