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Old 09-24-2004, 21:53   #61
Bravo1-3
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For removing screws with stripped heads, I use old broken drill bits. Whenever I snap a drill bit, I sand the snapped end flat on the belt sander. Put it in the drill, set the drill to reverse, and 9 out of 10 times the screw comes out.

If the piece is small enough that I can put it on the drill press, I just drill off the head of the screw. Don't do this if you need the piece attached with the threaded section, unless you don't mind the threaded portion of the screw being permanently stuck inside the piece.
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Old 09-24-2004, 21:56   #62
Bill Harsey
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Good thinking on the drills, I'll start saving them.
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Old 09-25-2004, 23:03   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harsey
Geronimo, Not going too far out on a limb here, you work for a living don't you? Good ideas!

I am well versed in the fine arts of aircraft maintenance and little else...

As for the drill bits for screws that works great and has the added benefit of not really screwing the screw up any worse should you need to use and ez--out on it.

you can also drill the screw head off and use vice grips to pull the shank once you've removed the material that the screw or bolt was holding in place.

Last edited by geronimo; 09-25-2004 at 23:06.
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Old 09-26-2004, 07:03   #64
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With a buggered screw head, I prefer to recut a new slot across the head with a hacksaw or Dremel tool, then remove it with the correct screw driver.

TR
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Old 09-26-2004, 08:03   #65
BMT (RIP)
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Redneck/SF Engineering

With a buggered screw head

Damn TR you been letting some Afgan use your tools.

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Old 09-26-2004, 08:06   #66
Bill Harsey
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That works good, if you can reach the screw head. Check your Brownells Gunsmithing catalog for slotting files designed to make screw heads, they really make 'em. If said screw is in a counterbored hole things get tougher.
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Old 09-26-2004, 08:48   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harsey
That works good, if you can reach the screw head. Check your Brownells Gunsmithing catalog for slotting files designed to make screw heads, they really make 'em. If said screw is in a counterbored hole things get tougher.
Dremel tool with a small diamond cut-off wheel will do it well, especially if you do not mind cutting the surrounding material a bit.

Thanks for the tip on the slotting files.

BMT, I was wondering who would be interested in that term.

TR
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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

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Old 09-26-2004, 08:54   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Reaper
Dremel tool with a small diamond cut-off wheel will do it well, especially if you do not mind cutting the surrounding material a bit.


TR
I'll bet that never happens on that bicycle with the V-Twin engine.
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Old 09-26-2004, 09:09   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harsey
I'll bet that never happens on that bicycle with the V-Twin engine.
Bill:

Very few slotted screws on that bike.

Mostly 3/8"-5/8" bolts/nuts, Allen, hex head, Torx and cap screws. Entire tool roll is about the size of a small coffee can.

Good thing that the post-AMF ones are so reliable, I tend to get mad when objects do not repond to my will and resort to impact and increasingly longer cheater bars. If it doesn't move, get a bigger hammer. I recently acquired a small torch and find it helpful as well, particularly on Loc-Tited fasteners.

TR
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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

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Old 09-26-2004, 09:15   #70
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TR,
I'd get a heat gun before I went to the torch. Less chance of burning/melting the paint or metal around the screw.
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Old 09-26-2004, 21:09   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geronimo
TR,
I'd get a heat gun before I went to the torch. Less chance of burning/melting the paint or metal around the screw.
Guys, You might find this useful. When I have to take apart a high value screw that's been chemically locked into place and flame heat would ruin or discolor the surrounding material. I take some 1/4 inch brass rod, taper one end on the lathe to fit the screw head, hold the rod with vice grips and heat up one end of it with the torch. In a semi-dark room this temp is judged by the beginning of incandescent color (glowing red) in the brass rod. I then place this rod directly on the end of the screw to be undone and wait a moment. Then I remove the screw with whatever wrench or driver it calls for.
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Old 09-27-2004, 18:20   #72
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Have had to do the same thing on helos to get some stubborn bolts out.

Works great. Where were you about ten years ago when I was trying to figure all of this stuff out the hard way?
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Old 09-28-2004, 06:11   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geronimo
Have had to do the same thing on helos to get some stubborn bolts out.

Works great. Where were you about ten years ago when I was trying to figure all of this stuff out the hard way?
Figuring it out the hard way myself.
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Old 09-28-2004, 21:19   #74
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I guess nothing is ever free!
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Old 10-01-2004, 05:17   #75
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OK, here's a duct tape redneck engineering (or something like that) story.

This was date # 2.5 and with someone I really liked, my first time in his car, and we hit this huge pothole a little with the front tire and a lot with a back tire.

I said, "Hey stop." He pulls over and stops. I definitely had heard something not right.

He stops. I said "That just punctured a tailpipe or something." He said, "No it didn't". I said, "Yes it did."

Realized he was more wanting it to not have happened rather than really evaluating whether it did or did not happen. Decided instead of debating it further, to simply say, "I'll check". Before he could protest, I grabbed my light from my purse and his jacket from the back seat. Put his jacket on the ground and used it to slide on. He quickly became not at all happy that I was under his car. I told him 30 more seconds and if he could put something over my legs that would help.

The puncture wasn't exactly on the end tailpipe, but close enough. (manifold?) Thankfully he had ducttape. We had a brief debate over who should put the ducttape on the puncture. I told him that if he would hand me the tape and a knife that I could be out in less than 30 seconds. I've seen on TV where the guy always cuts the duct tape with his teeth, but that seemed too guy-ish and kind of ick, so I asked for a knife . And yes, I could have used my knife, but decided he could supply the knife which would also keep him busy for a sec while I checked to see if anything else was damaged.

All was fine except for the back of my blouse because I had to scooch further than I thought I would. Luckily, he had a shirt I could change into, but this presented its own dilemma for a couple reasons, including that I didn't want him to see the UtB. I told him he had to close his eyes. He actually said something like, "Unless you have 3 breasts, it's nothing I haven't seen before..." It took a lot of restraint to not respond to that, but I didn't... I didn't think he was into guns at all, and that would not have been the right moment. I told him since the shirt clashed with the skirt, he had to think of Plan B for where to go. Anyway, that funny noise went away.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrino
Unfortunately the TO&E and a couple commanders without a sense of humor wouldn't support us acquiring and keeping a low pressure compressor to run the tools. Since we always had plenty of compressors producing high-pressure air for diving we used the dive tanks and dedicated an "unserviceable" diving regulator to run the tools/nailguns. It requires an investment in the equipment and a little pre-planning but its highly portable, doesn't require electricity, and saves a lot of effort when something has to be done right now. The only caution is to make sure the regulator's intermediate pressure is adjusted low enough that it won't damage the tools. Normal intermediate pressure is 135 +/- 5 psi. Most tools prefer something below 90 psi. The Conshelf XII/XIV made/makes an excellent regulator for this use because it's cheap, readilly available in pawn shops (you didn't think I was going to use my breathing regulator for this?), and the pressure can be adjusted without opening it up. There are some inexpensive adapters required to hook a 1/4" airline to the regulator but any dive shop can get them for you (got to love the IMPACT credit card!). We discovered that keeping the regulator set at factory specs with at least a 25' air hose and a mini "in-line" regulator next to the tool made for better flow rates (tools are bigger "air-hogs" than most military divers - especially if they're in continuous use)
Too clever!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrino
We've built a few SOCEPs in the middle of nowhere with some battery operated saws/drills and the nailgun hooked up to a SCUBA tank. Because I'm still into diving and have access to the HP air I've set up a similar system for my personal use that includes an air chuck and impact wrench for changing tires on the road. I've also used it on small carpentry jobs to run my finish nailer when I didn't want to lug around a full size compressor. The tanks support a surprising amount of work. FWIW - Peregrino
What is a SOCEP? I love the portability that solution brings. Seems like a very useful thing to keep in the trunk.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Razor
FS, when picking your lock, what did you use for a tension rod?
Hi Razor, in the bathroom stall with a broken lock / closer thing, it was less like picking a formal lock ( finding the right pins ) and more like disassembling a free-spinning handle and using the binder clip back to wedge a part inside.

I always thought lock-picking was a snails-and-puppy-dog-tails thing that really wasn't right ethically, and that the guys who were into it allegedly as a sport probably didn't always abide by the code (never take anything, leave it the same or better, etc.) However, from what I did learn about, it was still helpful to picture what was probably going on with the mechanism, and it also just helped me not have to wait forever for someone else. I do have a kgb lockpicking set somewhere in my moving boxes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by The Reaper
I also understand that clear fingernail polish (good for chigger bites) makes a decent RE substitute for Loc-Tite. Hopefully, married guys have a better access to nail polish than single gents. FS probably has the market cornered.
Hey I heard that!! I'm still trying to figure out why red fingernail polish chips faster than pink.

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