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Old 09-19-2004, 08:00   #46
Bill Harsey
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Keeping Nuts Locked

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Reaper
My brother has one of those, and the opposing force he calls a "Lincoln Locker".

Any idea what that is, to keep nuts attached forever?

TR
Yes, Don't do something stupid and let your wife find out. Sir Reaper, I believe the "Lincoln Locker" refers to using an electric arc welder to weld either the top or the base of the nut to whatever it's threaded to. This is pretty permanent but works. Also, do you folks know that you can use a cutting torch to remove a nut from a bolt without cutting or damaging the threads the nut was on? The bigger the nut and bolt, the easier this is to do. Anyone know why?

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 09-19-2004 at 08:12. Reason: not enough coffee
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Old 09-19-2004, 08:29   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harsey
Yes, Don't do something stupid and let your wife find out. Sir Reaper, I believe the "Lincoln Locker" refers to using an electric arc welder to weld either the top or the base of the nut to whatever it's threaded to. This is pretty permanent but works. Also, do you folks know that you can use a cutting torch to remove a nut from a bolt without cutting or damaging the threads the nut was on? The bigger the nut and bolt, the easier this is to do. Anyone know why?
Exactly. A little birdie must have told you that.

Heat transfer and metal expansion rates would be the explanation for your question, IIRC.

TR
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Old 09-19-2004, 08:54   #48
Bill Harsey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Reaper
Exactly. A little birdie must have told you that.

Heat transfer and metal expansion rates would be the explanation for your question, IIRC.

TR
Yes, Little birdie whispered the term "Lincoln Locker" but I had practised the technique for near thirty years as needed. "Lincoln" refers to the great American welding machine and related equipment manufacturer. Heat transfer, or actually the lack of is correct. If you stack two steel plates together and try to cut them at the same time with an oxy-acetylene torch, you can't do it. The oxygen stream depends on a red hot pre-heat to get the steel to actually burn. The red hot pre-heat will not carry from one plate to the next in a continual heat so the oxygen won't cut the second plate of steel. Same applies to the nut, you can cut the nut off while it's on the bolt. The trick here is to work fast and do not overheat the bolt threads because you are very close to heating them up and cutting them also. I make two vertical cuts down the nut, 180 degrees apart and then gently tap it off with a hammer.
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Old 09-22-2004, 20:56   #49
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For screws that are stripped out use some abrasive cleanser on the tip of the screwdriver. ie:comet, ajax, etc.

Thin nuts can be cut with a chisel the same way as noted above with the blue wrench.

For bolts that get stuck partially out:
Get a wrench small enough to fit over the shank of the bolt and put it against the head,this will be your "master wrench." Then get some other larger wrenches and stack them between the master wrench and the piece the bolt is stuck in, make a wedge with the wrenches and pry. This keeps the shank from being scored up and allows you to use lots of leverage without spinning the bolt. (spinning the bolt is very bad in close tolerance fits)
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Old 09-22-2004, 21:11   #50
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Geronimo, Not going too far out on a limb here, you work for a living don't you? Good ideas!

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 09-24-2004 at 06:25. Reason: failed to state deserved compliment
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Old 09-24-2004, 06:06   #51
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Redneck/SF Engineering

Well it looks like it's time to breakout my REDNECK RAIN GUAGE. A 5 gal. plastic bucket works real good. Measyred 10" during the last storm. Forecast for the next blow is 5-10 inches.

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Old 09-24-2004, 06:48   #52
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BMT, How does your rain guage compare to what the local weather says you get? This is out of interest, not doubt.
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Old 09-24-2004, 06:53   #53
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Bill my bucket was just about on the money. Here in Fl. the amount of rainfall can vary from oneside of town to the otherside.

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Old 09-24-2004, 07:01   #54
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BMT, I'm going to have to set out a bucket. We have one of those "fancy" calibrated rain guages. I've never been sure about that. We keep track of all precipitation daily on the calender. I've seen rain in Florida, you can have a wall of water coming down and take three steps over and be out of it. Little different here in Oregon.
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Old 09-24-2004, 07:42   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geronimo
For screws that are stripped out use some abrasive cleanser on the tip of the screwdriver. ie:comet, ajax, etc.
Also dipping the tip of your screwdriver into some good old Clover Brand Valve Lapping Compound works good.

Now, back to the "Hard to start" topic. You hit the ignition switch and only get solenoid chatter. Voltage is good, battery fully charged, but only chatters, even when "jumpered". Get a hammer, chock, brick,etc. and give the Starter Motor a couple of good "Raps" close to the brush end. This will usually allow the worn out brushes to get better seated against the commutator and is good for at least one more good start.

This procedure was actually spelled out in the Shorts-330 Aircraft Maintenance Manual. The Irishmen referred to it as "Malletizing" the Starter.

Later
Martin
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Old 09-24-2004, 07:55   #56
Bill Harsey
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AM, that works. Also works on electric motors that are hard starting (like my monster compressor in the shop when it's cold...boy do I hate admitting that...bracing for incoming comments now)
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Old 09-24-2004, 14:05   #57
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Blademaster,I hope you have found a hammer without a claw on the end. I seem to recall horror stories involving claw hammers and your leg.
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Old 09-24-2004, 19:28   #58
Bill Harsey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mumbleypeg
Blademaster,I hope you have found a hammer without a claw on the end. I seem to recall horror stories involving claw hammers and your leg.
That healed up pretty good after the plastic reconstructive doc did his work. I ground off the sharp ends of all hammers around here after that.
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Old 09-24-2004, 20:59   #59
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The heck with hammers. After all his years chucking wood, I want to hear Mr. Harsey's stories concerns birch hooks, cant dogs, twitcher skidders and chainsaws.
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Old 09-24-2004, 21:39   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razor
The heck with hammers. After all his years chucking wood, I want to hear Mr. Harsey's stories concerns birch hooks, cant dogs, twitcher skidders and chainsaws.
Razor, the wood we logged was too big for for cant hooks (refined by the Stillwater Maine Blacksmith Joseph Peavey in the late 1850's into the famous "Peavey" named for him) This tool was also known as a log wrench and was used to turn logs and break loose whole decks of logs into the water for running downstream to the mill. They are still used by the men in the mills and big rivers to position logs for the chain feed or make into a raft for loading onto ships. I've probably got too many stories about logging here in Oregon. I worked on High Lead logging sides, Skyline sides and worked logging with cats and skidders. Among the jobs I worked, setting chokers, rigging slinger, high climber and chaser. When I was trusted enough to run a cat around other men I got many hours building road, fire trailing and logging with several types of those machines. I spent quite a bit of time with a saw in my hands, used 2.5 gallon of saw gas per day on the last show I worked. For reference, that's a lot of cutting. We fell, bucked, yarded, sorted and loaded over 12 million board feet per year with an 11 man crew, not counting the truck drivers. This was done on most unfavorable ground and very long reaches. We did it because it was an old school oufit made of men who believed in pretty hard work. All this time I did all the welding I could and ran over two ton of welding rod for the logging side. This is how my interest in working steel started.

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 09-24-2004 at 21:41.
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