Go Back   Professional Soldiers > Kit Tips > Special Forces Fieldcraft

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-15-2004, 18:37   #16
The Reaper
Quiet Professional
 
The Reaper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Free Pineland
Posts: 24,467
FS:

An grad, contributing on a Redneck Engineering thread?

Please, feel free....

TR
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
The Reaper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 19:01   #17
alphamale
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Sir TR you perplex me so. I can never tell if you are serious or kidding. ::sniff::

Besides, I picked EE because it was supposed to be the hardest, not something useful like ME or (oh my god I wish I had picked...) Materials Science. So when I figure out anything mechanical and practical I feel like a genius.

EE even leaves one hazardous at doing home wiring. In all EE labs, black = ground. My muscle memory is hardwired for black = ground. In home wiring.... ZZZZZZ!

FrontSight

(who spent a week trying to grind my little knife and only had a really ugly grind and messed up fingernails and lots of swear words to show for it)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 19:28   #18
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
Grad?
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 19:45   #19
The Reaper
Quiet Professional
 
The Reaper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Free Pineland
Posts: 24,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harsey
MIT Grad?
With a EE degree.

Try to keep up, Sir.

I knew my two years in Materials Engineering and a scholarship from the Latrobe Steel Corp. would come in handy some day.

TR
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
The Reaper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 20:32   #20
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Reaper
With a EE degree.

Try to keep up, Sir.

I knew my two years in Materials Engineering and a scholarship from the Latrobe Steel Corp. would come in handy some day.

TR
Very interesting schooling TR, well done. No wonder I haven't been able to sneak anything by you. EE?

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 09-16-2004 at 06:48. Reason: not an MIT grad
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 20:43   #21
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
Back to work here! SUPER GLUE! Cyanoacrylate in a liquid form. Some things to know about it, *No. 1,* this stuff glues skin real good and acetone doesn't feel good to soak your eyes in so don't get it there. * No.2,* if you can use a rapid evaporating cleaner on metal parts, do it to remove any oils then blow on parts to be glued before using the glue. Super Glue needs some humidity to start setting up. This really works *No 3.* Super glue needs 24 hours to achieve full strength even though it seems full strong in moments. *No. 4* If you need to unglue Super glue on metal to metal parts, you can use heat from a torch. You don't need to go much above 300 degrees F and don't breath the smoke, it contains CYANIDE GAS. I've heard some people are allergic to that.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 20:48   #22
The Reaper
Quiet Professional
 
The Reaper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Free Pineland
Posts: 24,467
Ahem...thanks, Bill.

In keeping with this thread, you might note that you can use Superglue (Dermabond) medically for closing minor cuts, particularly clean ones. I have discovered that it is pretty good for MINOR edged implement injuries, though I am thus far prohibited from using it on the small people here.

TR
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
The Reaper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 20:59   #23
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Reaper
Ahem...thanks, Bill.

In keeping with this thread, you might note that you can use Superglue (Dermabond) medically for closing minor cuts, particularly clean ones. I have discovered that it is pretty good for MINOR edged implement injuries, though I am thus far prohibited from using it on the small people here.

TR
Good point, done that here before. If the super glue won't hold it closed, that's a pretty good clue one may want to consider more help. Understand the limitations on your medical practise. Same ones imposed here.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 21:16   #24
Maas
Gone Huntin'
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 90
Here's a couple, not as good as others.

1. I've seen coat hangers used as makeshift brazing rods.

2. Ever stripped out a socket head cap screw? Keep a metric set of allen wrenches handy, get the next size larger and usually you can tap it in with a hammer and remove the offending bolt.

3. This one for Frontsight ... try using a Lansky type kit to sharpen your knives. Or if you set on doing it by yourself, try making a line on the blade running parallel with the edge. A pencil will do, but a fine tipped marker or using a carbide tip scribe is better. It gives you a good point of reference.
Maas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 21:26   #25
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maas
Here's a couple, not as good as others.



2. Ever stripped out a socket head cap screw? Keep a metric set of allen wrenches handy, get the next size larger and usually you can tap it in with a hammer and remove the offending bolt.
Good example, same can sometimes work with wrenches and socket wrench sets. Never quit trying. If the steel wrenches fail, reach for the hot wrench.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2004, 08:49   #26
Razor
Quiet Professional
 
Razor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Colorado Springs
Posts: 4,363
FS, when picking your lock, what did you use for a tension rod?

TR, I'm sorry I never heard of the Latrobe Steel Corp. I guess I focused too closely on the other well-known Latrobe (PA) industry.
Razor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2004, 10:33   #27
The Reaper
Quiet Professional
 
The Reaper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Free Pineland
Posts: 24,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harsey
Good example, same can sometimes work with wrenches and socket wrench sets. Never quit trying. If the steel wrenches fail, reach for the hot wrench.
My brother has one of those, and the opposing force he calls a "Lincoln Locker".

Any idea what that is, to keep nuts attached forever?

TR
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
The Reaper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2004, 13:34   #28
CommoGeek
Guerrilla
 
CommoGeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: OCONUS
Posts: 415
Using AOL to email OPORD's to the B Team because the SOCA wasn't working. Does that count?

My old Det SGT used some spare wire and a soldering iron to make a harness to power PRC-70's and PSC-3's from a HUMV battery. It seems the 24v current was excellent for those older radios and we didn't have to use our supply of 5590's.

A slinky as an antenna for a PRC-127. I've since used a slinky as a field expedient antenna for civvie radios to receive as well.

Before CamelBaks were the rage, we'd take surgical tubing and attach it to the NBC caps on our 2 Qt. canteens.

For batteries (I used this for R/C cars, but the principle is the same) you can build a dissipater from car tail lights and wire. Batteries have a memory, so you want to discharge them at the rate they are used. Tail lights are cheap and have the amperage drain needed.
CommoGeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2004, 15:15   #29
The Reaper
Quiet Professional
 
The Reaper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Free Pineland
Posts: 24,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by CommoGeek
Using AOL to email OPORD's to the B Team because the SOCA wasn't working. Does that count?

My old Det SGT used some spare wire and a soldering iron to make a harness to power PRC-70's and PSC-3's from a HUMV battery. It seems the 24v current was excellent for those older radios and we didn't have to use our supply of 5590's.
IIRC, the AN/PRC-70 was initially designed as a vehicle radio for the Marines and was only modified to be battery powered in order to sell it to SF.

TR
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
The Reaper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2004, 18:56   #30
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Razor
FS, when picking your lock, what did you use for a tension rod?

TR, I'm sorry I never heard of the Latrobe Steel Corp. I guess I focused too closely on the other well-known Latrobe (PA) industry.
Can't answer for Ms. FrontSight but Sir, the full name to that steel company is Timken Latrobe. About everything you've ever rode in that goes fast uses bearings made from their steel. This would include any elevation you've enjoyed "above ground".
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 13:04.



Copyright 2004-2019 by Professional Soldiers
Site Designed, Maintained, & Hosted by Hilliker Technologies