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Old 04-26-2004, 20:42   #16
Team Sergeant
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Thumbs up Serrated

I’ve used both serrated blades and non-serrated blades. If I had to choose I’d pick the serrated blade as a general use pocket folder.
My thoughts are the same as Surgicalcrips. Those blades go through most things like a hot knife through butter. I’ve cut rope with a straight edge and there’s no comparison to a serrated blade. I’ve also found (IMO) that the serrated blade “seems” to hold an edge (at least for me) much longer than a straight edge.
Crip also nailed it as to why I still carry a Spyderco. If I lose it or break it I’m not going to wear out a set of knee caps kicking myself in the ass.
I’ve not tried a half and half so I cannot weigh in on those blades.

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Old 04-26-2004, 22:19   #17
Maas
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ambush Master
Crip,
Try a Lansky's with a Wedge Shaped "Serated Blade" Ceramic Stone. It makes it a pleasure and as long as you remember, or write down, what angle you used, it's a snap.

Take care.
Martin
I like a pocket knife with a partial S-blade. I carry a Benchmade.

I also use the Lansky System. I could never remember which angle I used on which knife. I bought one of those cheap electric engravers with a carbide tip and put it right on the blade next to the handle.
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Old 04-27-2004, 10:48   #18
Bill Harsey
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Here's what I think I know about serrations, Sal Glesser who founded Spyderco did a brilliant thing when he introduced the "Spyderco serration". This serration cuts very well especially in materials like nylons, ropes cardboards etc.. I also think another reason the serrations took off so well is that we are now several generations "removed from the farm", that is many young people have never been shown how to sharpen a knife. With serrations it's very hard to trash the entire cutting surface, usually hitting rock or metal with the blade will result in dulling the points of the serrations while the gullets (inside curve) stays sharp. Natural fiber ropes have a high silica content content and will dull good steel also. I'm pretty spoiled around here, I have a custom knife making shop and I can maintain my straight edge knives with little effort. Yes I prefer the straight non serrated edge for what I do, especially in game work. Just a personal preference, not saying this is a "correct" answer. We put the chisel tooth serration on the base of the Yarborough knife for those difficult to cut in an emergency jobs. We've tested this on materials as tough as small diameter aircraft cable and it will cut it. Chris Reeve has come up with a new variation of my original chisel tooth that may perform even better. One big advantage of the chisel tooth is that it can easily be field re-sharpened by just maintaining the same sharpening angle as the main edge, each side. We did this on purpose. Not a plug but a word about the CPM S-30V steel we use in the SF knives, S-30 contains vanadium carbides, vanadium does several good things to a tool steel and one of these is to form vanadium carbides which are harder than aluminum oxide (sharpening stones are made from this). This adds greatly to the edge holding ability including the points and gullets of the chisel tooth serrations in the SF knives. The reason we can sharpen this steel on a stone is that the matrix of steel holding the carbides in place will abrade away on a sharpening stone. THIS THREAD ISN'T DONE YET, I'M STILL LISTENING! Thanks, Bill
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Old 04-28-2004, 07:53   #19
Bill Harsey
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I think I misspoke in the last post here, In this shop I sharpen knives with the same technology available to everyone, simple stone on the bench. I use a Norton Fine India, it's about a foot long. I DO NOT sharpen on belt grinders, it takes away too much of the blade each sharpening. I'm worried that I came off with "I can do this and you can't..." in last post by me here. That's simply wrong. If major damage has been done to a blade, of course I will use a fine belt on the grinder to reshape the blade and resharpen. SHARPENING SERRATIONS! I do this by putting a fine bevel on the backside of the serrated blade. They come up very sharp and the edge lasts longer because it's not such an acute fine angle.
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Old 04-28-2004, 15:22   #20
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Aside from specialized tools I just assume have a plain edge knife.
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Old 05-04-2004, 12:21   #21
CrashBurnRepeat
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Oh great Bill, just make fun of us "I can barely sharpen a knife" crowd.


actually I prefer all my blades partially serrated. It's a having your cake and eating it too situation. While a good sharp straight edge cuts rope and hide and other stuff as well or better than serrated, serrated excels in a couple of areas. Namely, cutting bone or cartiliage, like the brisket of a deer.

I field dressed my last three deer with your Air Ranger (never sharpened it either which is sort of amazing) and I couldn't get through the brisket with the straight edge, I tried. But sliding it deeper ont the serrations and it just unzipped it.

Serrations also seem to work better on nylon rope or seatbelt material. Not that I go around cutting people's seatbelts to test it out a lot......


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Old 05-04-2004, 15:36   #22
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I knew I'd get busted for that comment. Good news that the serrations cut.
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Old 05-04-2004, 15:56   #23
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Quote:
Originally posted by CrashBurnRepeat
...Serrations also seem to work better on nylon rope or seatbelt material. Not that I go around cutting people's seatbelts to test it out a lot......

CrashBurnRepeat
Yes they do and I do all the time.
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Old 05-05-2004, 13:04   #24
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I had to go look at the 5 or 10 knives I brought with me on this trip and have come up with 8 non-serated and two serated (one full one partial). This comes as a shock because I prefer a combo edge for all the previously stated reasons. For sharpening I use a Edge Pro system, along the lines of a lansky but no clamp and much beter quality stones. I used to set it up on deployments and sharpen everyone's knives. I can still use a stone, but the Edge Pro is sooo much easier.
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Old 05-05-2004, 20:11   #25
Bill Harsey
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I'll have to make a point of checking out Edge Pro at Blade Show in Atlanta next month. Good report.
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