Old 12-07-2013, 22:32   #16
craigepo
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Originally Posted by greyshade View Post
Recovery/flexibility
Foam rolling has really helped me recover faster and improve my flexibility. Before any workout, ruck, run, I'll always make 10min to roll out and do a quick dynamic warm-up. Really has helped me out. I used to see guys using the roller in the course after rucks or before and I thought it was some sort of snake oil. Looking back I think I could have avoided a lot of pain and recovered faster if I had follow suit.
OK, I've been hearing about this foam rolling, but know absolutely nothing about it. Would you mind educating me a little more?
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Old 12-08-2013, 19:07   #17
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OK, I've been hearing about this foam rolling, but know absolutely nothing about it. Would you mind educating me a little more?
Craigepo,

Really I think the foam roller is an easy way to mimic an actual massage. "Foam rolling smooths and lengthens your muscles, and breaks up adhesion's and scar tissue." - Mens health article.

Before a workout this helped me be more limber. Combined with some different stretches I was able to gain a lot of flexibility quick. After a workout I really felt that I was able to recover faster. Especially using one after long runs and rucks. Rolling helped me not walk around in pain.

Buddy of mine broke his leg badly. He used a prescribed cold (metal) roller on his leg to break up scare tissue and encourage healing. Was a painful as hell but in the end combined with physical therapy his leg healed well and he has full range of motion.

You can also use something as simple as a tennis ball on those little spots around your shoulders. Of course it hurts a bit but it's worth it. Not unlike a good massage.

Here's a few that are popular on the market.

http://www.roguefitness.com/the-grid-black.php
http://www.roguefitness.com/tp-cold-roller.php (The metal one my buddy used)
http://www.roguefitness.com/mobilitywod-gemini.php

There's a whole bunch of peer reviewed studies done on the foam rollers specifically. A lot of good stuff said and some even insist that reduces arterial stiffness and improve blood circulation.

I'll swear by them.
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:52   #18
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Has anyone integrated this into their workout and preparation plans, how have you seen your progess change?
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Old 01-08-2014, 12:29   #19
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my quick $.02 ...

I picked up the aforementioned Rogue Gemini for "muscle smashing" along my spine and it helps keep things loose along my spine from rucking, lifting, and running. I also use a hard softball on all my tight spots as well and have actually cut back on my yoga and static stretching as a result of doing more rolling and muscle smashing. I've also used PVC pipe (+/- 3 or 4" diameters) as a foam roller and it'll really do the job. Some use racquetballs but I don't feel that I get the same pressure plus they get caught up under my clothes which the slippery softball doesn't seem to do.

I can't say if this has made me any "faster" as I've been gradually but increasingly integrating it over the last few months but I can say that I am stronger and feel a difference in strength, movement, overall flexibility, and recovery. ...which one could rationalize would allow you to train more, and at higher intensities... etc, etc.

I'm new here and don't want to plug products but since we're talking about mobility and how it affects one's training, the book "Becoming a Supple Leopard" is definitely worth a read if you're interested. The author also has a pretty good u tube channel.

...now back to PT. Train hard fellas!

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Old 01-09-2014, 00:42   #20
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Has anyone integrated this into their workout and preparation plans, how have you seen your progess change?
I just saw this post for the first time today. If you give me a month I can get back to you with before/after stats.

After reading your post about how well you perform at the UBBRs I'd really like to emulate your success.

Currently I'm following the SFAS prep listed here:
http://www.usarec.army.mil/hq/sfas/prepare.html

Your workout vs. the SFAS prep doesn't seem that different. The SFAS prep says to do 18 mile rucks but I've read in a few different places that guys don't recommend going beyond 6-8 miles. Would you recommend doing a high miles ruck once in a while, or never rucking more than 6-8 miles to avoid injury?

Thanks for your time,
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Old 01-09-2014, 15:35   #21
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Just my thoughts but it's good to get up to 12 every once and awhile to see your long distance pace, feet problems, and water consumption. Pay attention to your per mile pace and try to remember why you were fast or slower for those miles. It can be something as simple as opening your hips up more, having your head down, extending your stride, etc. I think those long rucks really bring out good and bad habits that make the difference.

As far as going up to 18- if I can do 12 I can probably do 18 just fine and I feel you can spend your time in the weight room and get more benefits than those extra six miles will give you. I can always increase either my pace or my ruck weight to get the same or better benefits adding miles would do.
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Old 01-09-2014, 15:44   #22
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Thanks for the advice.
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Old 07-25-2014, 12:12   #23
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Just an update as I have been doing this sort of routine for nearly two years:

-NO injuries of any kind
-A pretty formidable physique, 6'2" 225 lbs

Deadlift: 405x5
Squat 360x5
Bench 260x5
Powerlifting total (1RM): 1150
12 mile ruck: 2:14
5 mile run: 35:00
Pushups and sit-ups for days.

It has been a gradual 5 to 10 pound increase for the lifts each week and holding off if I am just not increasing on my numbers. I feel as I am in the best shape of my life at 27. Now it is time to buckle down and hit the endurance.

Keep it up and never quit!
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Old 07-25-2014, 13:24   #24
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How do you all feel about a low tech approach? I was a typical, skinny kid when I started preparations for selection and was poor to boot. I bought a used rucksack and new tennis shoes and that's it. I followed the 6 week regimen prescribed in the recruiting pamphlet and not much more. I didn’t use any supplements, computer devices, or expensive accessories. Mostly I prepared by running and rucking by day and night, in the rain, and without music or other nonsense. I got comfortable in my misery because I knew I wouldn’t have anything else to rely on. In other words, is anyone worried that the absence of all those aids will be missed if used to prepare? I say train simple and miserable, and assume selection will be 10 times worse and you’ll almost be prepared.
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Old 07-26-2014, 08:03   #25
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I agree with what you are saying and that is exactly how I went at my selection but honestly was in the middle of the pack. What I found was that those in the top 10% definitely had a certain level of fitness and it seemed like they knew exactly what pace they needed to be moving and how to maintain that pace. They all seemed to have a certain physique that looked like they could just do work for days. My goal is to help guys get to that level where it will NEVER be their body giving out on them, only their mind can beat them. I really don't provide specifics beyond just doing work six days a week and listening to their bodies. The advice has helped little guys get stronger, and the stronger guys get even more elite. Maybe it is just the motivation.
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Old 07-26-2014, 18:41   #26
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Yea that's a good point Bechorg. Since I was more worried about the mental than the physical I personally focused more on toughening my mind than anything else. I knew many others had made it before me so I didn't worry too much about the timing/distance thing. I wasn't necessarily a super-stud but went in confident without knowing exactly how fast or far I could go. To be honest, it wasn't as hard as I was expecting even though I ended up with a 14 day profile.
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Old 07-26-2014, 20:41   #27
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...Since I was more worried about the mental than the physical I personally focused more on toughening my mind than anything else...
The mind will carry the body along much further than the body can carry the mind. I have thanked God many times for making me of strong will and body.

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Old 07-26-2014, 21:36   #28
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The mind will carry the body along much further than the body can carry the mind. I have thanked God many times for making me of strong will and body.

Crip
Exactly.

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Old 07-28-2014, 12:34   #29
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Every once and awhile my mind will take me to that place, the numb, detached place in selection where the body is on autopilot. It is hard to remember because it is all a blur, all I can remember is telling myself to just keep going. I decided the only way I would walk away without finishing was to be carried out.

Pretty much lost during land nav, my feet feeling like they were about to fall off. Truth is, I wanted to quit. During SOPC, during selection, before phase 2, during phase 2. I just didn't know if it was for me. Something in my head just told me to follow through and just keep going. Somewhere along the way it finally clicked and I pulled myself together.

At the peak of a mountain in the mid day sun with no water in Afghanistan I wanted to quit. I just didn't know how after being through so much. Resiliency is gained through more ways than one, and failure has always taught me the most. For every stud that runs every ruck and is used to crossing the line first there are hundreds of guys who torment themselves and juggle thoughts that they just aren't good enough and they should just give in. Everyone knows "that guy". I was him many times, I just learned how to work out of the job. I scraped myself from the bottom and I am still average, I can't just show up every day even after 8 years. It's a beautiful thing.

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Old 07-29-2014, 16:22   #30
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Every once and awhile my mind will take me to that place, the numb, detached place in selection where the body is on autopilot. It is hard to remember because it is all a blur, all I can remember is telling myself to just keep going. I decided the only way I would walk away without finishing was to be carried out.

Pretty much lost during land nav, my feet feeling like they were about to fall off. Truth is, I wanted to quit. During SOPC, during selection, before phase 2, during phase 2. I just didn't know if it was for me. Something in my head just told me to follow through and just keep going. Somewhere along the way it finally clicked and I pulled myself together.

At the peak of a mountain in the mid day sun with no water in Afghanistan I wanted to quit. I just didn't know how after being through so much. Resiliency is gained through more ways than one, and failure has always taught me the most. For every stud that runs every ruck and is used to crossing the line first there are hundreds of guys who torment themselves and juggle thoughts that they just aren't good enough and they should just give in. Everyone knows "that guy". I was him many times, I just learned how to work out of the job. I scraped myself from the bottom and I am still average, I can't just show up every day even after 8 years. It's a beautiful thing.

I was thinking alot about your workout advice.

Great Advice, I felt the same way about SUT I wanted the students to fail because they did not have the drive and could not handle the stress of squad dynamics, not because of no skills. IMO whether they VW or go forward and quit later or not I want every soldier I trained to walk away feeling they had the best training of their career from a Green Beret standard bearer.

Giving advice is not an issue the motivation and initiative to train for SFAS comes from within.

Part of the selection process begins with drawing the right guy and then his initiative for preparation to accomplish the tasks. Initiative is the key, today they have SOPC or SFPC that IMO is gaming SFAS and is creating huge issues by getting low quality guys who have to BE trained under watchful cadre IOT be prepared for selection and even with all the added prep just to pass SFAS these guys are barely getting by and the quality we see in SUT is not as good as it was i the crusher era.
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