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Old 03-15-2011, 07:47   #1
Irish
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Disaster preparation

TR asked me to start this thread based on the earthquake and tsunami which struck here in Japan, on 11 March 2011. His question was, "what preparations you had and what you wish you had done?"

These are the preparations that I'd made for where I live. My wife and son are also familiar with this because we do walk throughs of the drill every 6 months. My main focus has always been having things in my pack that will help me to sustain life (for 3 people) for 72 hrs. The plan has always been to return to the house if safe/possible. If the house isn't an option the car is a back up store of sorts if safe/possible. Anything past 3 days and I figure I'd have to start getting creative.

Evacuating my home:
1.) Previously planned 2 ways to exit any room in the house.
2.) Had a designated route to a set evac location on elevated ground.

Gear: (in a NICE 6500 pack centrally located in the house).
1.) Goretex top/bottom (3 sets).
2.) Fleece beanie (3).
3.) Gloves (3 pair).
4.) Sleeping bag (3).
5.) Fleece jacket (3).
6.) Socks (3 pair).
7.) Hiking shoes (3 pair).
8.) MRE (9 field stripped).
9.) First aid kit.
10.) Bic lighter (3 inside water proof bag).
11.) Signal mirror.
12.) Whistle.
13.) Multi tool.
14.) Head lamp (3).
15.) Battery (3 set each lamp).
16.) Chem light (9).
17.) Map.
18.) Silva ranger compass.
19.) 550 cord (Roll).
20.) Water (3 liters).
22.) Chapstick.
23.) Cell phone with charger.
24.) Tel #s written in notepad.
25.) Cash.
26.) Copies of personal docs of 3 people (marriage lic/passports/SSN card/birth cert/bank acct/routing #) in waterproof bag.
27.) Copy of house key/car key.

Stores at home:
1.) 5 gal water jugs (2).
2.) Various canned goods.
3.) AM/FM radio.
4.) Batteries.
5.) Flashlights.
6.) Small propane grill.
7.) Propane tank.
8.) Portable TV.
9.) MRE case (2).

Stores in car:
1.) 5 gal fuel can (1).
2.) MRE case (1).
3.) First aid kit.
4.) E-tool.
5.) Multi tool.
6.) Blankets (3).
7.) Water (3 gal).
8.) Bic lighters (2).
9.) Come along and straps.
10.) Flashlight.
11.) Batteries.
12.) Flares (2).
13.) Fishing rod/reel.
14.) Tackle box.
15.) Duct tape.

Things I wish I had done:
1.) Not really sure about this question. I think I did pretty well based on my main objective which is sustaining life (3 people) for 72 hrs while possibly having to move around. I could cram a lot more things for long term survival into a 6500 cu-in pack, but at the cost of moving quickly. This is my evac bag, so I keep it basic and light. If we get into a situation where after 72 hrs we need to start to hunker down, move to another area, or what have you, then I can source/add water to the load at that point because it's not maxed out yet.

I'm looking forward to the input...
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Last edited by Irish; 03-15-2011 at 09:34.
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Old 03-15-2011, 09:58   #2
Bill Harsey
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Outstanding post.
Might throw in a pocket knife too, those blades on the multi tools are not the best for sustained use.
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Old 03-15-2011, 10:15   #3
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Me and the wife wre talking about our plan (again) after the crap storm that hit Japan.
On your list is one of the things Iv been considering changing. You carry a big ass pack. Is your wife carring her own or are you carring for the 3 of you? Im assuming the munchkin is too young/little.

Right now we (me and wife) each have our BOBS, for 3+ days of supplies, 3 days of food and clothes, the + being the ability to get more food, water, etc...

Im wondering if instead of carring fairly heavy rucks with all that in there, if it wouldnt be better to go to smaller bags with the essentials in them and small duffles with the food/clothes, sleep bags etc.. that way if we have to leave the transportation (truck/bike, canoe, etc...) quickly we would have the small bag close/on our person vs. having to take the time to grab and load up a ruck.

Did you guys have to leave your house? Did it work? anyone else have a say?
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Old 03-15-2011, 10:15   #4
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That's very close to what I have, except for heat tabs, water purification tabs and 3 knives.

I don't have MRE's, though-just rice, beens and canned salsa.

I have 14 gallons of water in the car, as well, as well as 2 containers of deet juice, 50 feet of 500-lb nylon rope, a mosquito net and two tarps.
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Old 03-15-2011, 10:31   #5
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water purification tabs or filter? or both?
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Old 03-15-2011, 11:11   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeyB View Post
You carry a big ass pack. Is your wife carring her own or are you carring for the 3 of you? Im assuming the munchkin is too young/little.

Did you guys have to leave your house? Did it work? anyone else have a say?
I carry the load for 3 people. Our son is 5 yrs old, so this frees my wife up to grab him. The pack remains packed and ready to go 24/7/365 (unless it's unpacked for maintenance/inspection).

Yeah, we evac'd according to plan, with the pack, as soon as the tsunami/evac warning sounded. And yeah, for all intensive purposes it worked.
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Old 03-15-2011, 11:12   #7
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water purification tabs or filter? or both?
Unfortunately, neither. It's something I know I need to get.
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Old 03-15-2011, 11:13   #8
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Outstanding post.
Might throw in a pocket knife too, those blades on the multi tools are not the best for sustained use.
But pocket knives are illegal here
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Old 03-15-2011, 11:58   #9
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My kit includes smaller rucks, but have one of the larger, 4 wheel heavyduty garden type variety red wagon wheel barrels to move another 350lbs over rough terrain. My son is of the age he can pull security up front, I, the dad, does the heavy lifting, and maintain command control from the element center, my youngest will watch the backtrail.

When not needed for movement, the wagon can be used for shetler, or scavenging operations, recovery of caches, etc. Will be building a portable winch system, 3/8" cable, 200' - 1000 lbs. strength, car battery operated, total weight remains under 50#s. In an emergency, I could dump the load, and exfill any member of my family hurt to an aid station with little jaring to the injured person.

I would plan on building a forge if fixed location is established, the ability to move iron, wood/coal fuel would be needed.
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Old 03-15-2011, 12:50   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeyB View Post
Me and the wife wre talking about our plan (again) after the crap storm that hit Japan.
On your list is one of the things Iv been considering changing. You carry a big ass pack. Is your wife carring her own or are you carring for the 3 of you? Im assuming the munchkin is too young/little.

Right now we (me and wife) each have our BOBS, for 3+ days of supplies, 3 days of food and clothes, the + being the ability to get more food, water, etc...

Im wondering if instead of carring fairly heavy rucks with all that in there, if it wouldnt be better to go to smaller bags with the essentials in them and small duffles with the food/clothes, sleep bags etc.. that way if we have to leave the transportation (truck/bike, canoe, etc...) quickly we would have the small bag close/on our person vs. having to take the time to grab and load up a ruck.

Did you guys have to leave your house? Did it work? anyone else have a say?

I would prefer to carry a pack for three people and let my wife carry the child on a front or back pack than to have two packs and try to drag a small child on a multi-mile cross country movement. I doubt that most kids under six or eight could keep up. OTOH, if they are eight to ten or older, might not be a bad idea to let them carry a small pack with part of the load.

Depending on what you are fleeing, and where, if you have to move, and cannot drive a vehicle, as options, a bike, wheelbarrow, kid's wagon, or garden cart is a good way to move extra gear or exhausted kids.

Excellent plan and rehearsal. Well done!

Sounds like your BOB is set up fairly well for three days or so.

As far as the list goes, I would consider adding some more shelter gear to the ruck (tent and bags, or at least a couple of ponchos, heavy duty survival blankets, and one sleeping bag), plenty of extra socks, tinder, a whistle and mirror per person, more water storage (bladders), toilet paper, a trowel or e-tool, contractor trash bags, Zip-Locs, a square or two of heavy duty aluminum foil, at least a seven day supply of any needed meds, a blow-out trauma kit as well as the usual camping type 1st aid kit, spare glasses, if necessary, small hygiene kits (airline sized is good), hats, some duct tape, a machete/camp axe/big knife, a towel, some wipes, pocket chainsaw, solar charger and rechargable batteries, pocket sized radio with shortwave, a few microlights (at least one red one, for low-signature/night vision preservation, water purification (pump, MIOX, or tabs), some trail mix or high carb snacks, individual servings of Crystal Light or other water flavoring, tea or coffee, salt and pepper, maybe a GPS, a thumbdrive with scanned copies of documents, address book, mail settings, etc., a roll or two of pre-64 dimes (or appropriate silver for your country), a 10'-12' piece of tubular nylon webbing, a small tube of Shoe Goo, some OC spray, bug juice, camping pots and flatware (or a couple of canteen cups and a metal spork or two), an Esbit or camping stove, a few chemlites, very small fishing kit and snares, one pocket survival kit per person, and a camera, if your phone does not have one, etc. Apparently, a bottle of potassium iodide might be handy to have along as well. Most of this stuff is small and would not add much bulk or weight to your kit.

The home kit might benefit from a tub liner water bladder, if you have a standard sized US type tub, solar charger, some dried rice and beans, oatmeal, etc., some tools, especially demolition tools (like prybars, saws, wrecking bars, chainsaw, Hi Lift jack, comealong, an axe, sledge, rope, a pulley set), a lantern with batteries or fuel and mantles/wicks, a larger water filter (Big Berkey or other ceramic filter), cash, coins, basically more of everything from the BOB except for shelter.

The car kit needs a tool kit, tire repair kit, several cans of Fix a Flat, a really good jack, recovery kit (add an axe, bow saw, etc.), spare belts and hoses, collapsible water jug, water, Esbit, Sterno, or small camp stove, blankets, fuel injector cleaner (emergency fuel, too), jumper cables, hygiene kit, snacks, cash, etc.

I like to rotate older gear being replaced into the other kits.

Not being critical, just a list of additional items to consider. You know your needs better than I do.

Overall, I think you have one of the better kits I have seen. I hope it served you well.

TR
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Old 03-15-2011, 12:55   #11
Bill Harsey
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Irish,
guess that rules out the swords.

TR,
For carry weight nothing can beat a bow saw.
Keep a couple fresh blades taped to the frame.
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Old 03-15-2011, 13:06   #12
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Run on iodine

U.S. Drug Stores Report Sudden Increase in Potassium Iodide Sales

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/03/15...iodide-sales/#

"..One drug supplier says it has sold 250,000 anti-radiation pills to people in the U.S. concerned about possible exposure from Japanese nuclear reactors.

Troy Jones, president of Nukepills.com, said his company sold out over the weekend of potassium iodide pills, which prevent against radiation poisoning of the thyroid gland. Jones, in an interview with FoxNews.com, said that the pills were sold to dozens of U.S. pharmacies, corporations, hospitals and nuclear labs.................."

Better to have it and not need it than to need it and nor have it. Looks to be a little late to be stocking up on potassium iodide pills.

And in case you wonder about water purification (iodine) tabs - thats Tetraglycine Hydroperiodide.

Edited to add to TR's thoughts on bikes. Reguardless of the situation bikes for the family makes sense. In a "stay" situation bikes don't require gas and allow fairly quick movement within the neighborhood. In a "go" situation they can be mounted on their rack on the back of the vehicle - just in case. Make it to where you're going and they are available for use there.
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Old 03-15-2011, 13:34   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post
U.S. Drug Stores Report Sudden Increase in Potassium Iodide Sales

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/03/15...iodide-sales/#

"..One drug supplier says it has sold 250,000 anti-radiation pills to people in the U.S. concerned about possible exposure from Japanese nuclear reactors.

Troy Jones, president of Nukepills.com, said his company sold out over the weekend of potassium iodide pills, which prevent against radiation poisoning of the thyroid gland. Jones, in an interview with FoxNews.com, said that the pills were sold to dozens of U.S. pharmacies, corporations, hospitals and nuclear labs.................."

Better to have it and not need it than to need it and nor have it. Looks to be a little late to be stocking up on potassium iodide pills.

And in case you wonder about water purification (iodine) tabs - thats Tetraglycine Hydroperiodide.

Edited to add to TR's thoughts on bikes. Reguardless of the situation bikes for the family makes sense. In a "stay" situation bikes don't require gas and allow fairly quick movement within the neighborhood. In a "go" situation they can be mounted on their rack on the back of the vehicle - just in case. Make it to where you're going and they are available for use there.
You ought to see the prices on Ebay for the KI3 and KIO3 tabs......can you say rape. I checked yesterday and there were maybe 5 sellers most of whom were selling a $20 bottle for $300 to$1000. Those sellers are gone, but there are 5x that many new sellers today.
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Old 03-15-2011, 13:45   #14
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I guess the buyers missed the article on using betadine on the skin to achieve the same effect.

TR
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Old 03-15-2011, 14:04   #15
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All over the PI

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I guess the buyers missed the article on using betadine on the skin to achieve the same effect.

TR
That story is all over the PI. News sources are showing officials saying "It don't work".
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