Old 01-22-2004, 11:40   #1
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Welcome! Please Read

NEW INFO. Updated as of 9/14/12. Please let us know when there are any additional changes. Thanks!



The intent of this new forum is to provide information and respond to questions which cannot otherwise be answered through research or contact with the appropriate parties.

It is not intended to rehash topic already beaten to death, readily available information, or to provide an unfair advantage to soldiers attending SFAS or the SFQC. Please refrain from asking those sorts of questions here. Also avoid questions which would pose an integrity issue, or deal with matters of OPSEC or PERSEC.

90% of all questions can be answered by looking here, be sure to examine all of the sub-menus:

http://www.sorbrecruiting.com/SF.htm


Specific answers to questions can be found at the FAQ here.

http://www.sorbrecruiting.com/SF_FAQS.htm


We will periodically be posting articles of interest, advice, or information for those interested in SFAS and the SFQC.

If your question cannot be answered by the above web site, a search of topics here, an internet search, or a recruiter, we will try to take the time to research it and respond. Since we are unpaid volunteers who do this in our personal time as a service for the benefit of prospective Special Forces personnel, please do not abuse this privilege by asking inappropriate or previously posted questions which have already been answered.

The 18X program is for initial entry soldiers and there is an in-service recruiting program for current soldiers. Other services may or may not allow a service transfer for their personnel to attend the SFAS Course and transfer to the Army. Go to the above site, contact a recruiter, or if you are currently a soldier, contact your nearest SF Recruiter, or call the SF Recruiting Company Headquarters at (910) 432-1818. If you want to join a National Guard SF unit, see a recruiter in the area who is affiliated with the unit where you wish to drill.

Recruiters are soldiers and their jobs are to get people into the military in the proper balance to satisfy Army requirements and Recruiting Command goals. For that reason, they may or may not be willing to assist you with your specific desires. They are always interested in getting you to join the Army, however. Bear this in mind when the recruiter tries to steer you into another MOS or assignment than the one you want. Do not be afraid to seek another recruiter.


Many questions may deal with eligibility and waivers.

Medical standards are outlined in Army Regulation 40-501, Standards of Medical Fitness, dated 28 MAR 02. Some items are waiverable, and some are not. DO NOT LIE ABOUT YOUR MEDICAL HISTORY.

The full text is available here:

http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r40_501.pdf


Clearance questions are more difficult. You MUST be able to obtain a SECRET clearance to enter SF Training (NOT SFAS). Some SF MOS will require a TS clearance. We cannot tell you whether you will be able to get a clearance. Your recruiter and MEPS will assist you with the process. In general, bankruptcies and financial management problems, criminal histories beyond minor traffic offenses, histories of drug and alcohol abuse, extremist/gang membership, etc., may be disqualifiers. The best advice is to keep your nose clean, straighten your act up if you have strayed, and NEVER, EVER LIE ON YOUR CLEARANCE APPLICATIONS.

The reference is:

http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r380_67.pdf



SF Initial Entry Pipeline (18X)

Initial Enlistment 12 Weeks DEP (Entry as E-3)

Infantry OSUT 14 Weeks

Airborne School, if not Airborne Qualified (TDY Enroute) 3 Weeks

PCS to FBNC

SFPC, SFAS, SFQC as listed below.

PCS to Assigned SF Unit (as E-5)

Average Total Time from Enlistment to SF Unit 22-24 Months
(Includes wait times but not recycles)


SF In-Service Pipeline

This is constantly in flux.

Recruitment of E-4- - E-6 (<14 Years Service) from Assigned Unit

(Average of 12 weeks from Recruitment to arrive TDY for SFAS)

SFAS (Phase I) 4 Weeks

Assigned Unit

(Average of 40 weeks before PCS orders to SFQC)

Airborne School, if not Airborne Qualified (TDY Enroute) 3 Weeks

ACLT (PLDC) 3 Weeks
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Old 04-02-2006, 15:31   #2
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Pipeline Changes

The following is the most current info available about the SF Pipeline.

If this changes, and it probably has, you should still be able to get the latest skinny by doing a little independent research.

The sequence of the SFQC is frequently evolving.

The most current data is here.

http://www.soc.mil/swcs/_pdf/AcademicHandbook.pdf

Good luck.

TR

Special Forces Preparatory Course (SFPC)
Course Number: 011-F82 Clearance:
Class Size: 120 Iterations: 10 per year Course Duration: 3 Weeks 4 Days
See ATTRS for course dates
Scope: This 19-day performance-oriented course includes physical conditioning, map reading and land navgation instruction; land-navigation practical exercises and common-task training.
Course Description: To prepare and condition 18X and REP-63 (National Guard) Soldiers to attend Special Forces Assessment and Selection course and the follow-on Special Forces Qualification Course.

Special Forces Assessment and Selection (SFAS)
Course Number: 2E-F129/011-F44 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: 350 Iterations: 10 per year Course Duration: 4 Weeks 4 Days
See ATTRS for course dates
Prerequisites: N/A
Scope: This 19-day performance-oriented course includes psychological assessments, intellectual assessments, land-navigation assessments, and team trek events.
Course Description: Assess each Special Forces candidate for trainability and suitability to attend the Special Forces Qualification Course. Utilizing a whole-man approach, each individual is assessed based on the core attributes required for service in ARSOF and under the character attributes as defined in USAREC Pamphlet 610-25. Assessments are made throughout the course, which consists of physical fitness/confidence events, intelligence/psychological exams/ assessments, land navigation assessments and team trek events.

Special Forces Qualification Course (SFQC)
Soldiers selected to attend the SFQC will PCS to Fort Bragg, N.C., where they will begin the rigorous training of the SFQC. The course focuses on core tactical competencies, MOS skills, survival and language and culture skills. Upon completion of the SFQC, Soldiers join the Special Forces brotherhood, earn the right to wear the Special Forces tab and don the highly coveted Green Beret.
Course Description: The course consists of six sequential phases of training:

SFQC Phase I - Course Orientation and History (7 weeks)
Course Number: 2E-F253/011-F95 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: 180 Iterations: 8 per year Course Duration: 51-57 Weeks
See ATTRS for course dates 90 Weeks for 18D students
Course Description: : Phase 1 of the SFQC is the SF Orientation Course, a seven-week introduction to SF. Dubbed the Orientation and History module, the course falls under the auspices of the 4th Battalion, 1st Special Warfare Training Group (Airborne).
The course is separated into six modules:

Module A
Introduction to Unconventional Warfare. This phase of training will expose the students to the overall learning objectives and outcomes of the SFQC, train them in tactical geurrilla warfare, and most importantly, provide them the operational and strategic context under which they will train for the remainder of the SFQC. Under the supervision of the cadre in Robin Sage and mentorship of the “G” chiefs, the students will complete this phase with a firm understanding of what will be expected of them throughout the remainder of the SFQC and the importance of UW in the Special Forces mission. This is an introduction to the students to UW at the beginning of the SFQC through their participation in Robin Sage as “Gs”.

Module B
Introduction to Special Forces. To provide the Soldiers an understanding of Special Forces, its history, organization, attributes and the core tasks that relate to their mission. Lessons include SFODA and SFODB numbering convention, command and control architecture, joint special-operations area, duties and responsibilities of each MOS, SF planning and organization, core mission and tasks, SOF physical fitness and nutrition. The training is to prepare our future Special Forces Soldier forwhat is expected of him and the standards that he must acquire to graduate the SFQC and be a member of the brotherhood and regiment.

Module C
Introduction to Special Forces. To provide the Soldiers an understanding of Special Forces, its history, organization, attributes and the core tasks that relate to their mission. Lessons include SFODA and SFODB numbering convention, command and control architecture, joint special-operations area, duties and responsibilities of each MOS, SF planning and organization, core mission and tasks, SOF physical fitness and nutrition. The training is to prepare our future Special Forces Soldier for what is expected of him and the standards that he must acquire to graduate the SFQC and be a member of the brotherhood and regiment.

Module D
Airborne Operations and Refresher. This module allows the Soldier to maintain his jump proficiency and prepare for the training he will encounter throughout the SFQC.

Module E
Special Forces Planning. This module provides the Soldiers an understanding of the Special Forces Mission Planning process. The Soldiers are given classes on the Military Decision Making Process followed by a practical exercise that reinforces the training.

Module F
Operational Culture and Regional Analysis: The purpose of this instructional module is to give students a foundational understanding of the battlespace including: operational culture and a systems’ analysis of an area. The lessons include a view of one’s own cultural lenses, leading to an understanding of the perspective of others as well as the use of PMESII-PT system of regional analysis to deduce the capabilities, people and environment of a given area. The Pineland Area Study will be used as the basis for analysis allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the training environment.

SFQC Phase II, Language and Culture
Course Number: 2E-F253/011-F95 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: Iterations: per year Course Duration: 18-24 Weeks
See ATTRS for course dates
Course Description: Phase 2 of the SFQC focuses on language and culture. During Phase 2, Soldiers receive basic special-operations language training in the language assigned to them at the completion of Special Forces Assessment and Selection. Languages are broken into two categories based on their degree of difficulty. Soldiers who are assigned a Category I or II language will be enrolled in an 18-week language program, while Soldiers who are assigned a Category III or IV language will attend 24 weeks of language training.

Students receive instruction in three basic language skills: speaking, participatory listening and reading (limited). The following areas of emphasis are covered during the training: overview of physical and social systems, economics, politics and security, infrastructure and technology information, culture and regional studies. Language instruction focuses on functional application geared toward mission-related tasks, enhanced rapport building techniques, cultural mitigation strategies, interpreting and control of interpreter methods. Also during Phase 2, a progressive PT program is started in order to prepare for Phase 3.

To successfully complete Phase 2, Soldiers must achieve a minimum of 1/1 Listening and Speaking as measured by the two-skill Oral Proficiency Interview.

SFQC Phase III, Small Unit Tactics (SUT)
Course Number: 2E-F254/011-F96 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: 180 Iterations: 8 per year Course Duration: 12 Weeks 4 Days
See ATTRS for course dates
Course Description: Small Unit Tactics is the third phase in the qualification course. The 13-week program provides Soldiers in the SFQC the apprentice-level tactical combat skills required to successfully operate on an SFOD-A.
Students will master the following tactical skills: advanced marksmanship; small-unit tactics; SF common tasks; urban operations; mission analysis; advanced special operations level 1; sensitive-site exploitation; military-decision making process.

At the end of Phase 3, Soldiers will enroll in SERE Level C, where they will receive intensive training in support of the Code of Conduct. Training includes survival field craft skills, techniques of evasion, resistance to exploitation and resolution skills in all types of environments. Students will participate in a survival and evasion field-training exercise and in a resistance-training laboratory. The course spans three weeks with three phases of instruction. The first phase lasts approximately 10 days of academic instruction on the Code of Conduct and in SERE techniques that incorporate both classroom training and hands-on field craft.

The second phase is a five-day field training exercise in which the students practice their survival and evasion skills by procuring food and water, constructing evasion fires and shelters and evading tracker dogs and aggressor forces over long distances. The final phase takes place in the resistance-training laboratory, where students are tested on their individual and collective abilities to resist interrogation and exploitation and to properly apply the six articles of the Code of Conduct in a realistic captivity scenario.
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

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Old 04-02-2006, 15:31   #3
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SFQC Phase IV, MOS Training
Course Number: 2E-18A, 011-(B, C, D or E)30-C45 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: 180 Iterations: 8 per year Course Duration: 14 Weeks
See ATTRS for course dates 90 Weeks for 18D students
Course Description: Each Soldier going through the SFQC is assigned to one of five military occupational specialties: detachment commander, or 18A; weapons sergeant, or 18B; engineer sergeant, or 18C; Special Forces medical sergeant, or 18D; and communications sergeant, or 18E.

18A - Special Forces Detachment Officer (2E-18A)
Prerequisites: Officer must have successfully passed the SF Orientation Course, Language, SUT, Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape before entering AOC training. Any variation from these prerequisites requires a waiver from the Commanding General, SWCS.
Purpose: To train selected officers in the critical branch (18A) tasks and competencies required to perform the duties of a detachment commander of a Special Forces ODA.
Course Description: Focuses on the full operational spectrum of problem analysis and resolution design associated with SF core missions across the elements of national power spectrum. Duties and functional-area familiarization of the 18 series MOSs: communications, engineer, medical, weapons, intelligence; the military decision making process; special-operations mission planning; adaptive thinking and leadership; special reconnaissance; direct action; unconventional warfare; foreign internal defense; counterinsurgency operations; military operations in urban terrain; interagency operations; warrior skills; Advanced Special Operations skills; OPFUND management; elements of national power considerations; culture; in-depth core mission analysis; information operations, planning and conduct of ODA training; and three field-training exercises.

Module A - Special Forces Mission Analysis and Planning: The module provides student officers with an introduction to SOF mission peculiar software; fire support; an introduction to IO; mission planning utilizing the MDMP; target analysis; infiltration/exfiltration planning; non-conventional unassisted evasion and recovery planning.

Module B - Adaptive Thinking and Interpersonal Skills: This module develops the officer’s ability to perform in an asymmetrical environment. An adaptive leader is one who can intuitively identify and resolve complex problems simultaneously at multiple levels by influencing those around him, providing purpose, direction and a vision of his intended outcome, while anticipating and shaping second- and third-order effects in a dynamic and ambiguous environment.

Module C - SR/DA : This module teaches the doctrine associated with special reconnaissance and direct action missions and provides an introduction and overview of sensitive site exploitation operations and target site exploitation.

Module D - Foreign Internal Defense/Counterinsurgency: This module develops the officer’s capacity to develop a strategy based approach to FID support planning, and training that employs a methodology of balanced, decentralized, intelligence driven lethal and nonlethal operations across the operational spectrum. It emphasizes the importance of combined, multinational and interagency integrated operations and the establishment and functionality of mission supportive informal command relationships to stimulate their capacity to act as force multipliers. This module includes a FID/JCET FTX where students work by, with, and through host nation partners.

Module E – Unconventional Warfare: This module teaches student officers how to implement the developmental processes of an insurgency and identify the components of an insurgency. Implement the role and functions in operations as it relates to the seven phases of US sponsored insurgency. Demonstrate the uses of UW as a strategic option during the initial phases of a Geographic Combatant Commander’s Campaign Plan. This module includes UW Case Studies and a Case Studies Brief and a UW Pilot Team FTX.

Module F – Advanced Special Operations: This module familiarizes students with the basic fundamentals of advanced special operations.

Module J – MOS Cross Training: This module provides officers with knowledge and education of the duties, responsibilities, and capabilities of the individual MOS members of the SFODA. It identifies what the 18B, 18C, 18D, 18E are trained on during the SFQC and provides a familiarization of the role of the SF Warrant Officers, Operations Sergeant, and Intelligence Sergeant to future detachment commanders. This module will also provide limited MOS specific cross-training to students in the 18A Phase IV SFQC.

The Special Forces operational detachment commander is a captain who has been awarded the 18A MOS. He commands the detachment and is responsible for everything that the detachment does or fails to do. The commander may command and/or advise an indigenous battalion combat force. The commander will regularly meet abroad with the country team to include ambassadors, foreign ministers of defense and foreign presidents. He ensures his detachment is trained for combat anytime, anywhere and in any environment. The commander ensures that he and all of his detachment members are cross-trained on all assigned equipment and duties in case of injury or death to a detachment
member during a mission.


18B - Weapons Sergeant (011-18B30-C45)
Weapons sergeants have a working knowledge with weapons systems found throughout the world. They gain extensive knowledge about various types of U.S. and foreign small arms, submachine guns, machine guns, grenade launchers, forward-observer procedures and directs fires and indirect-fire weapons (mortars), anti-tank missiles. They learn the capabilities and characteristics of U.S. and foreign air defense and anti-tank weapons systems, tactical training and range fire as well as how to teach marksmanship and the employment of weapons to others. Weapons sergeants employ conventional and unconventional tactics and techniques as tactical mission leaders. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.
Prerequisites: Student must have successfully passed the Special Forces Orientation Course, SUT and Survival, Evasion, Resistance and escape before entering MOS training. Any variation from these prerequisites requires a waiver from the Commanding General, SWCS.
Purpose: To train selected Soldiers in the critical MOS and skill level (18B30) tasks and competencies required to perform the duties of a Special Forces weapons sergeant on an SF ODA.
Course Description: Direct- and indirect-fire systems and procedures: mortars, light/heavy weapons, sniper systems, anti-armor systems, forward observer and fire direction center procedures, close air support; Warrior skills; combatives; plan and conduct training; field training exercise.

Module A
Light Weapons: The purpose of this module is to produce a weapons sergeant capable of employing, maintaining and engaging targets with select U.S. and foreign pistols, rifles, shotguns, submachine guns and machine guns and grenade launchers

Module B
Heavy Weapons: The purpose of this module is to produce a weapons sergeant capable of employing, maintaining and engaging targets with select U.S. and foreign anti-armor weapons, crew-served weapons, mortars and in the utilization of observed fire procedures.

Module C
Tactics: The purpose of this module is to produce a weapons sergeant proficient in Special Forces and light-infantry tactics through platoon level.

Tactics FTX: This module develops the student’s knowledge, skills and understanding of the Special Forces weapons sergeant on
tactics, techniques and procedures that affects mission planning as it pertains to SF operations. This will increase the student’s
understanding of his operational environment.
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

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Old 09-14-2012, 20:11   #4
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18C - Engineer Sergeant (011-18C30-C45)
Engineer Sergeants are experts in employing offensive/ defensive combat engineer capabilities to include demolitions, U.S. and foreign landmines, explosives and improvised munitions, construction, home made explosives, reconnaissance, and target analysis.
The construction module requires Soldiers to learn to read blueprints as well as design, and to construct a theater-of-operations building, as well as field fortifications to be used as fire bases while deployed on an SFODA.
Special Forces engineers are taught basic to advanced demolition skills that will enable them to destroy targets in non-electric and electric firing systems, with U.S., foreign and civilian demolition components.
Engineer sergeants plan, supervise, lead, perform and instruct all aspects of combat engineering, demolition operations and theater-of operations construction engineering in either English or their target language. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.
Prerequisites: Student must have successfully passed the Special Forces Orientation Course, SUT, Language and Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape before entering MOS training. Any variation from these prerequisites requires a waiver from the Commanding General, SWCS.
Purpose: To train selected Soldiers in the critical MOS and skill level (18C30) tasks and competencies required to perform the duties of a Special Forces engineer sergeant on a SF ODA.
Course Description: Basic military construction techniques and procedures; basic and intermediate demolitions; Special Forces Tactical Facilities, UXO/IED; target analysis/interdiction and mission planning; Warrior skills; combatives; plan and conduct training; and field-training exercises.

Module A
Demolitions: To provide students with baseline knowledge of explosives theory, their characteristics and common uses, formulasfor calculating various types of charges and standard methods of priming and placing these charges. Lesson plans include explosive entry techniques, demolition material, demolition safety, firing systems, calculation and placement of charges, expedient charges and range operations.

Module B
Special Operations Construction: To provide students with knowledge and training in the role of an SF engineer; blueprints (read/design); construction of a masonry wall; welding, concrete construction, types and sitings of obstacles, wire obstacles, fighting positions, bunkers and shelters, camp construction/fortification, heavy equipment operations (skid-steer loader, scraper, grader, scoop loader, utility tractor), electrical wiring, plumbing and logistical operations.

Module C
UXO/IED: To provide students with knowledge and skills in the construction, demolition and emplacement of special-purpose munitions and unexploded ordnance, including IEDs. Homemade expolosives.

Module D
Reconnaissance: To provide students with knowledge and training in target analysis/interdiction and mission planning.

Module E
Engineer Field Training Exercise: To complete the foreign internal defense scenario-based 18C SF engineer tasks.


18D - Medical Sergeant (011-18D30-C45)
Medical sergeants specialize in trauma management, infectious diseases, cardiac life support and surgical procedures, with a basic understanding of veterinary and dental medicine. Both general healthcare and emergency healthcare are stressed in training.
Medical sergeants provide emergency, routine and long-term medical care for detachment members and associated allied members and host-nation personnel. They establish field medical facilities to support unconventional-warfare operations. They provide veterinary care. They prepare the medical portion of area studies, briefbacks and operation plans and orders.
Soldiers selected for MOS 18D attend 250 days of advanced medical training. Additionally, they spend two months of the year on a trauma rotation in hospital emergency rooms. The medical-training phase includes a nationally accredited emergency medical technician paramedic program. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.


18E - Communications Sergeant (011-18E30-C45)
The Special Forces communications sergeant has to learn U.S. communication systems as well as those systems found throughout the world. He must incorporate this information and technology into his communications planning, and teach it to the other members of his ODA. Communications sergeants have a thorough grounding in communication basics, communications procedures, computer technology; assembly and systems applications.
They must understand communication theory — how to install, operate and maintain FM, AM, HF, VHF and UHF radio systems. They must be able to make communications in voice to data, and to read voice and data radio nets by utilizing computer systems and networks.
Communications sergeants are experts in sending and receiving critical messages that link the SFODA with its command and control elements. They are familiar with antenna theory, radio wave propagation and how to teach it to others. Communications sergeants prepare the communications portion of area studies, briefbacks and operation plans and orders. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.
Prerequisites: Student must have successfully passed the Special Forces Orientation Course, SUT and Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape before entering MOS training. Any variation from these prerequisites requires a waiver from the Commanding General, SWCS.
Purpose: To train selected Soldiers in the critical MOS and skill level (18E30) tasks and competencies required to perform the duties of an SF communications sergeant on an SFOD-A.
Course Description: The course provides training in computer applications, satellite radios and satellite and antenna theory and radio wave propagation. Soldiers will learn how to construct field-expedient antennas, employing communications procedures and techniques and communicate throughout the HF, VHF and UHF spectrums, all culminating with a field training exercise. The course goal is to develop a world-class SF Communicator capable of employing, accessing and familiar with SF, joint and interagency communications.

MODULE A — Course Orientation: Provides the students with the information of what is covered in the 18E Course, the student evaluation plan and conduct while attending the course.

MODULE B — Computer Applications: This module instructs Soldiers to become proficient in computer applications A+ training and NET+ training. The A+ training provides Soldiers the training necessary to troubleshoot and repair basic computer components, hard drives, power supplies, motherboards, video cards and other internal components of a computer. The Net+ training provides Soldiers the training necessary to network computers in a LAN and WAN and setting up servers and routers. Installing, operating and maintaining the SND-L and SOMPE-G. Students are postured at the end of this module for external certification in CompTIA+ network and security.

MODULE C — Communications Procedures: The module instructs the Soldiers on basic communications fundamentals such as basic radio theory, basic electricity, radio telephone procedures, signal-operating instructions, communication security, power applications and information operations/electronic warfare as they pertain to an SF communications sergeant.

MODULE D — Radios Common to the Army: Students receive instruction on the operation of radios and radio-secure systems common to Army units such as the AN/PRC-148, AN/PRC119F, AN/PYQ-10 simple key loader and the AN/CYZ-10 electronic transfer device.

MODULE E — Satellite Communications: Soldiers learn satellite theory, the use of satellite radios such as the AN/PSC-5C/D AN/PRC-117G and BGAN attenna and the radio’s modes of operation, demand assigned multiple access and point to point operations.
The Soldiers are also trained in the use of multiple computer applications such as VIASAT, PDA-184, and MoVer to install, operate and maintain satellite communications links.

MODULE F — Communications Planning: The Communications Planning Module instructs Soldiers in the matters of communications planning such as transmission site selection, the duties and responsibilities of the SF communications sergeant, signal support in the Special Forces group, MDMP, mission planning and preparing a signal annex to an operations order as it pertains to his duties and responsibilities.

MODULE G — High Frequency Communications: The module instructs Soldiers in the use of the high frequency (HF) radio spectrum to communicate, such as training in antenna theory and radio wave propagation, the calculation of length to determine how to make HF antennas for short, medium and long-range communications. The operation and troubleshooting of the AN/PRC-137 special mission radio set (SMRS) and AN/PRC-150 are also taught.

MODULE I — Field Performance: This module measures the Soldiers ability through testing and grading to measure proficiency in the use and techniques of the equipment and procedures taught throughout the SF Communications Sergeant Course. The Soldiers must achieve a passing grade to become qualified.
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

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Old 09-14-2012, 20:11   #5
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SFQC Phase V, Culex (4 weeks)
Course Number: 2E-F255/011-F97 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: Iterations: per year Course Duration: 4 Weeks
See ATTRS for course dates
Course Description: For more than 40 years Robin Sage, the culmination exercise for the SFQC, has been the litmus test for Soldiers striving to earn the coveted Green Beret. It is during Robin Sage, held in 15 rural North Carolina counties, that Soldiers must put all of the skills they have learned throughout the SFQC to the test in an unconventional-warfare training exercise that is unequalled.
The exercise, broken into two phases, puts students on their first SFODA. The SFODA is trained, advised and mentored throughout the entire exercise from mission receipt through planning and infiltration. During the first week, the students are taught the necessary skills to survive and succeed in a UW environment utilizing the small group instruction teaching methodology. The remaining three weeks focus on their planning and application during Robin Sage.
The students are placed into an environment of political instability characterized by armed conflict that forces Soldiers to exercise both individual and collective problem solving. A key to the success of the Robin Sage training is its real-world feel that is established by the use of guerrilla forces. The SFODA must assess the combat effectiveness of the G-forces, and then train them in basic individual tasks from each of the MOSs as well as collective tasks in basic small-unit tactics, while remaining responsive to asymmetrical challenges. Just as language plays a key role in all other phases of the pipeline, language skills will be put to the test during Robin Sage. During this training, the SFODA must demonstrate its knowledge of UW doctrine and operational techniques.

Participating in this rigorous and realistic training exercise the future Special Forces Soldier learns the skills and confidence to successfully deploy with an SFODA.


SFQC Phase VI, Graduation
Phase 6 is the final phase and is comprised of one week of outprocessing, the Regimental First Formation where students don their green berets for the first time, and the graduation ceremony.



Finally, if you guys have watched the videos here, and followed the 12 week physical prep, and still don't know how to prepare yourself, you probably are not SF material.

These videos give you a huge amount of info.

http://www.sorbrecruiting.com/SELECTED_VIDEOS.htm

Best of luck.

TR
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
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Old 02-10-2014, 16:35   #6
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Special Forces Training

The latest from the Recruiting Command website.

TR

http://www.goarmy.com/special-forces/training.html

Special Forces

TRAINING
Green Berets Go The Extra Mile

As a member of the Army's Special Forces you will find strength you never knew you had. The road to get there has a number of unique challenges. All Green Berets go through the same basic training as enlisted Soldiers, but are given other opportunities for special training, including Airborne School. For the first time in many years the Army is recruiting civilians to join the U.S. Special Forces.
Special Operations Preparation Course (SOPC)

This is a 30-day course taught at Fort Bragg is designed to help Soldiers prepare for the Special Forces Assessment and Selection course. It focuses on physical training and one of the most important skills a SF Soldier can have — land navigation. This course does not guarantee you will pass the Special Forces Assessment/Assignment and Selection (SFAS).
Special Forces Assessment And Selection (SFAS)

This is 24 days of training like you've never experienced. And it's all about survival. Your intelligence, agility and resourcefulness will all be tested. If you make it, you can continue on to the SF Qualification Course.
Special Forces Qualification Course (SFQC)

The SFQC consists of five phases (II-VI). If you complete this training, you will be a Special Forces Soldier, one of the Army's experts in Unconventional Warfare.
Individual Skill

The individual skill phase (II) consists of land navigation, small unit tactics and live-fire training.
MOS Training

During the MOS training phase (III) you will be instructed on your specialty skills, which will be based on your background, aptitude and desires.
Collective Training

This phase (IV) consists of Special Forces doctrine and organization, Unconventional Warfare operations, Direct Action operations, methods of instruction and both Airborne and airmobile operations. You will deploy to the Uwharrie National Forest, North Carolina, for an Unconventional Warfare exercise. There you will perform as a member of an Operational Detachment Alpha (ODA). Your specialty and common skills will be evaluated.
Language Training

Language training (phase V) is a key phase of the qualification course. Proficiency in at least one foreign language is part of being a Green Beret. Arabic, Spanish, Chinese and Russian are just some of the languages learned.
Sere Course

The Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) course will end your training in the SFQC (phase VI).
Live Environment Training (LET)

As an SF Soldier, you might receive training that completely immerses you in another culture. You'll learn to be fluent in that country's language, customs and traditions, becoming a virtual citizen of that country.
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

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