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Old 01-01-2007, 20:02   #1
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Rifles, Carbines, and Accessories, a Primer

Rifles, Carbines, and Accessories, a Primer

Introduction

There is a good bit of discussion today about carbines and what proper accessories are.

Many websites are out there with tons of information. Some is from experts, some is from guys who use their guns for games, and some is from kids who have not owned anything more lethal than an Airsoft rifle. An experienced warrior will hold the edge with a 1903 Springfield over a wannabe with a SIG 552. The weapon is merely a tool, and possession of the latest and greatest no more makes one a soldier than owning a Stradivarius would make me a concert violinist.

In light of that, I would offer the following as my personal opinions as a former action guy who has been a few places and done a few things, nothing particularly HSLD. I have access to a lot of different options and have, as I suspect that many of you do, accumulated several boxes of parts that were recommended or looked cool that once mounted, just didn’t do the job. I still shoot regularly and am involved with training SF and SOF personnel.

A brief history

It is generally accepted that the assault rifle had its beginnings in Germany with the STG-44. It was a compact, magazine fed, self-loading, selective-fire carbine chambered for an intermediate-powered cartridge, the 7.92x33 Kurz. The AK-47 has many similarities. Early post-War thinking led Western arms designers to believe that a full-powered round was a better choice for the next war, so despite the efforts of the Brits, the US pushed NATO into the 7.62x51 round, basically a shortened .30-’06. Rifles developed for it were the M-14, the FAL, and the G-3. These rifles generally used a 20 round magazine and loaded, weighed in the neighborhood of 9-11 pounds with an overall length of 40-44”. Eventually, the weight and size of the rifle and the ammo, combined with increasing numbers of females in the service, led the US to move to their first assault rifle, the AR-15, which became the M-16, using the 5.56x45 round.

Choose the right tool for the job

As with many things, requirements should drive your weapons selection. If you will need to make 600 meter shots, shoot through cars and buildings, or make head shots at 300 meters, an assault rifle/carbine is probably not the right selection. If you are looking for a lightweight, portable weapon to carry indoors, or in a vehicle, to be used at shorter ranges, but to possess more power than an SMG or pistol, then the assault rifle/carbine is the optimum choice. If you are a civilian who wants a weapon for home defense, unless you are anticipating a Night of the Living Dead scenario, a thirty round mag, a HSLD optical sight, the ability to engage out to 300 meters and beyond, and the ability to penetrate 4 interior walls are probably negatives, especially when you have to explain it in court. The weapon will look “offensive” to the uninformed, and collateral damage is going to be difficult to justify. Get a Remington 870 that looks like Grand Pa’s duck gun instead. It will work wonders on several intruders. If you are deploying to the Box as a servicemember or a contractor, and want to maintain proficiency, or get some good accessories, this is the place to get the skinny.

The basis for a good set-up is the right weapon. There are many assault rifles and carbines to choose from today. I have a fair amount of trigger time on AKs, Galils, ARs, M14s, Berettas, FNs, HKs, Steyrs, SIGs, etc. They each have their pros and cons. Most, in one form or another, are available to civilians in free parts of the US. Pointless, “feel-good” legislation, illegal policies, and nambyism have limited the availability of some, and raised the prices of most others.

A Sturmgewehr or full-sized battle rifle like the M-14, HK G-3, or FN-FAL shoots a full-power rifle cartridge, normally a 7.62x51. While there are environments where that is needed, it will be heavier, will recoil more, be more difficult to control, will tend to penetrate barriers better, and the ammo will weigh twice as much or more than an intermediate power assault rifle round. That means that you will only be able to carry half as many rounds. Not a problem if you are only carrying it from your car to the firing line, but if you actually have to hump it with a basic load, it can become tiring very quickly. That is why the basic load for an M-1 or an M-14 is about half what it is for the M-16. There are “carbine” and Para versions of these rifles. They will recoil more, have more muzzle blast, and generally be even more difficult to control. And the ammo will still be heavier than the assault rifle.

Characteristics

The assault rifle will generally be chambered for one of the common assault rifle cartridges, like the 7.62x39, 5.56x45, or the 5.45x39. It will have a detachable box magazine of 30 rounds capacity or more. Actual assault rifles will be capable of controlled full-auto fire. It will weigh between six and nine pounds and will be about 30-36” on overall length.

The first thing a gun must be is reliable. The most precise weapon or the best accessories in the world are useless if the gun doesn’t go ban when the trigger is pulled. That is one of the advantages of the AK. No matter where it was made, or how poorly it is maintained, or the condition of the mag, or how crappy the ammo, it will almost always work reliably. At the same time, it is not a precision weapon. The AK is probably among the most reliable under a variety of adverse conditions, with the others falling somewhere underneath. With good mags and ammo, the AR is capable of cycling reliably for several thousand rounds before cleaning becomes necessary. That many rounds exceed what most would expect to fire in a single engagement. It does not mean that it should not be cleaned sooner when time permits.

Second, the weapon must be accurate enough for its intended purpose. Most AKs are accurate enough for engagements under 100 meters. Beyond that, it becomes questionable. Some, with the right ammo will shoot well out to 300 meters. Most will not. ARs tend to be among the more accurate, along with HKs and SIGs. A carbine is not a sniper weapon. If you expect it to be, you are likely to be disappointed. The abbreviated barrel of a carbine normally has a shorter sight radius and gives up a significant amount of muzzle velocity to the full-sized counterpart. At the same time, it is lighter and more portable. If you anticipate the need to reach out and touch targets at extended ranges, this should affect your decision. The majority of combat engagements are taking place under 100 meters though. Take your rifle and gear out to the range, jock up, and see what your groups look like at 100 meters. If that went well, move the target out to 300 meters and try again. That is your practical accuracy, rather then the theoretical accuracy you get off of a sandbag. Your max effective range is realistically what you can do with your gear from combat shooting positions against a man sized target, like a Series E silhouette, or for a more realistic challenge, a KZ-sized paper plate. As with hunting, you need to know what your limits are, as well as that of your equipment, and respect them.

Many assault rifles and carbines are designed for differing people with differing ergonomics. However, ergonomics on some rifles are clearly better then others. While the selector switch on an AK also functions as a dust cover, it is needlessly difficult to manipulate when in a firing position and is noisy. The Galil attempts to address this, but is only marginally successful. The M-14 retains the Garand slotted safety at the front of the trigger guard. This requires the trigger finger to come off the trigger to take the safety off, and for the trigger finger to reach around the front of the trigger guard to activate it. For right handed shooters, the optimum placement of the safety appears to be on the left side of the receiver, above the thumb. The AK and most older weapons require the supporting hand depress a latch to remove a magazine, and many require that the mag be “rocked” out of the mag well from rear to front, thus slowing a reload as the hand must first remove the empty mag before reinserting the fresh one. The AR allows the index finger of the shooting hand to depress the mag release and drop the empty mag without assistance. On the older rifles, the bolt is designed to be operated by the right (shooting) hand. The FAL, G-3, and ARs are charged and cleared with the left (support) hand (though the HK requires the operator to reach far out onto the forend to do so). Failure drills and loading will be faster with such as system. I do like the raised vertical bolt handle of the Galil, as it allows for easy manipulation by either hand. Finally, the AK has no bolt hold open, and neither does the HK. The AR series do, and it is easily accessible by the support hand after inserting a magazine. It is large enough to permit slapping with the hand, rather than requiring a precise move to operate. The AR is much faster to reload than the AK, the HK, the M-14, or even the FAL. Sights are important to accuracy. I am probably prejudiced, but I think that the M-14 has the best sights. The AR, FAL, and G3 are good, but lack the quick, fine adjustments of the M-14. The AK sights are fast and robust, but are of very short radius and only grossly adjustable, contributing to the accuracy issue.
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Old 01-01-2007, 20:05   #2
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(Continued)

The price of the weapons system must also be considered. If the rifle is inexpensive, but mags, rails, etc. are expensive or not available, it may not be a bargain. Generally, I would stick with a military-type rifle in a common military caliber. The rifles we are discussing run from $400 to $3000, plus mags and accessories. Mags can be as little as $5 each up to $100 or more, depending on the weapon. With a SIG or SR-25, it can be very expensive to accumulate the 8-20 mags that I like to have for my long guns, along with all of the rest of the gear.

In case you have not detected up to this point, the weapon that I believe provides the optimum mix of reliability, accuracy, ergonomics, and affordability is the AR series. It just feels right in my hand, and will do what I need an assault rifle or carbine to do. Another advantage is that the 7.62 versions use exactly the same controls and muscle memory to operate, and in some cases, even parts are interchangable. Thus everything from a dedicated shorty like the CQB-R to an M-4, to an SPR, to an M-16, to a 7.62 shorty, to a mid-length 7.62 carbine, to a Mark 11, Mod 0 7.62 sniper rifle works almost exactly the same, allowing transition for what is essentially an SMG all the way through a dedicated sniper rifle without relearning a new manual of arms and set of controls that are significantly different. Pick it up and if you are familiar with one, you can run any of them just as well.

Brands

There are many makers of AR type rifles and carbines out there. While a good maker may occasionally have a poor rifle go out the door, a poor maker rarely puts out a good one. An inexpensive AR is normally a false economy which you will pay for repeatedly. The best ARs I have used lately have come from LMT and Rock River. Armalite, Colt, and Bushmaster normally make decent rifles, but occasionally have problems. If you start with good receivers, you can build a good AR with quality parts, but it will be much easier (and cheaper, unless you plan to buy the tools) to buy the upper with the barrel already installed. Other manufacturers may make a decent rifle as well, but before I bought one, I would ask for a money back guarantee from the store I was buying from.

Parts

Some people think that parts are parts. I believe that there is a difference. In many cases, “government” or “surplus” parts are in fact, rejected or stolen. Buy your parts from reputable sources. Brownell’s would be a good source for quality parts. Gun shows may not be. Caveat emptor!

Optioning the weapon

Upper


The M-4gery is one of the most common configurations of the AR. It is a good set-up that allows people to have a weapon that approximates the weapon that the HSLD troops carry. It is light, quick, and effective at ranges out to 300 meters. IMHO, for a number of reasons, the 16” variant is the one to have. If you are going to be primarily shooting M856 Tracer or match bullets of 75 grains or more, then you need the 1x7” twist barrel. If you are going to shoot a mix of ammo from 50 to 75 grains, I prefer the 1x9” twist. If you have a full-auto lower, or plan to blast away mags as fast as you can, you need the heavy barrel. If not, you don’t. The chrome-lined chrome moly barrels may be slightly less accurate than the stainless steel barrels, but they are also lower maintenance. For the carbine, or a tactical weapon, I prefer the chrome lined version. The M203 cut down is an affectation, unless you have an M203 or plan to get one. Frankly, if you can afford a 203 and the ammo, you can afford another upper. While the standard issue A2 birdcage is a good flash suppressor, the Phantom and Vortex are better. I do not like the carrying handle on my uppers if I plan to mount an optical sight. They are nice to get as you can chop them down with a saw to make a good economical detachable rear sight. The Colt uppers have double heat shielded handguards which are somewhat larger than most other brands. As I prefer rail type fore ends, I would skip the more expensive handguards. I have a box full of takeoffs. The forward assist is controversial. Some people love them and some hate them. While it is possible to build a flat sided upper, I prefer to have the FA, just in case. The POF/DSA/HK piston driven uppers are nice, but are currently very expensive. Unless you have the extra bucks, I would skip them and get a quality flat-topped upper with a 16” 1x9” straight profile barrel, capped with a Phantom flash suppressor. If I were not using NVDs, I would probably run a tritium front sight post from Trijicon.

Bolt Carrier Group

Inside the upper are the guts of the rifle, the bolt carrier assembly. This is one of the areas most commonly involved in malfunctions. Get a good quality bolt and bolt carrier. I prefer the chrome plated ones when I can find them for ease of cleaning. I also like the O-ring mod to the extractor to give it a little extra grip on the rim. There is no need for titanium firing pin or other affectations, unless you like giving money away. The charging handle is your contact with the bolt carrier assembly. There is a fine line between making the charging handle easier to access and making it large enough to be in the way. I like the PRI Big Latch installed on a normal carrying handle. If you are going to be shooting with a can on the rifle, or have the extra money, the PRI Gas Buster is the best charging handle available and it already has the Big Latch installed.

Lowers

The lower and upper should be of the same brand, unless you are going to be able to mate them in person. A few thousandths here and there and pretty soon, your rifle is sloppy or hard to put together or take apart. A good lower fit is an important thing. Use quality components in your lower. You do not want your rifle doubling, not going boom when it should or worse yet, going off when it shouldn’t. Get the RRA or comparable two-stage match trigger. You should be a much better shooter with it. It is hard to shoot well with a creepy, nine pound trigger. I like the Falcon Ergo Sure Grip (it also comes with a Gapper), but some find that other grips meet their needs better. The Otis Grip Cleaning Kit will also fit in the Falcon, if you load it just right. I am not a fan of the winter trigger guard, unless you wear heavy gloves a lot. Ambidextrous safeties are a good thing if you are left handed, or anticipate being so. Do NOT use M-16 parts unless you have a registered Class Three weapon. As a matter of fact, as discussed extensively on another thread, there are only a couple of uses for a fully automatic weapon, other than blasting for fun, and it is hard to justify the $10,000 for a registered M-16 lower just to do that.

Stocks

While the fixed buttstock is stronger, a collapsible buttstock s very handy if the weapon is to be carried in and out of tight quarters, like vehicles, aircraft, structures, etc., or you wear a mix of heavy gear like armor, vests, winter clothing, etc. It also fits an assortment of different users better, like armory weapons have to. Among the collapsible stocks, I prefer the feel and function of the Crane SOPMOD buttstock on my carbines, though some prefer the Magpul stock.

BUIS

Every tactical weapon needs back-up iron sights. All optics can be broken, and most are battery powered. After using cutdown carrying handles, Knights, ARMS, Troys, and PRIs, I have found the Troy to be my first choice for both rear and front sights, if the front is not fixed. It maintains a lower profile and is easier to use than most of the others. It is not spring loaded though, and the ARMS #40 L, which would be my second choice, is, if you like that feature.

Optical Sights

Optical sights are like opinions, but here goes. I have used the Aimpoint, EOTech, Trijicon reflex, TX-30, ACOGs, Leupolds, Elcans, and an assortment of copies of them. I like the EOTech 552/553 for CQB and close work out to 100 meters, and the Trijicon TA-31 RCO ACOG if the ranges will go beyond that. You are welcome to drop $300-$1500 each to decide for yourself.

Mounts

To keep the expensive optics securely mounted and zeroed, I prefer the LaRue mounts. I have used most of the others and prefer the LaRue for security and repeatability of zero. And Mark is just a great American.

The micro dot sights like the Docter Optic and J Point are nice options if your primary is not optimal for CQB or you need a backup. Some put them directly on top of the primary optic, at which point your cheek weld becomes a chin weld. I prefer the 1:30 mount off the forend like the Yankee Hill Machine mount.

Foreend

The foreend, as I stated, needs to be railed. I have the KAC RIS and RAS, the PRI, the LaRue, the SIR, the SureFire, and a couple of manufacturer’s private brands. If you want a free-float tube, I prefer the LaRue. If you are on a tighter budget, or do not need the free-float capability, it is hard to argue against the SureFire, which installs easily, locks up very tightly, and is reasonably priced. The SureFire uses sexy looking ladder covers, which are very nice unless the weapon gets hot. If you are going to be doing any blasting, get a set of the larger plastic covers and install them before proceeding, unless you like the ladder burns on your support hand.
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Old 01-01-2007, 20:07   #3
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Illumination

All tactical firearms which could be carried at night need a light for target ID and engagement. I like the SureFires due to the quality, durability, power, run time, and availability. Among the SureFire weapons lights, I like the M900/M910 series with the built in vertical foregrip, the M951/M961 series, or the M600 Scout Light on the 3:00 rail. My personal preference for a long range, powerful light is the M910A with the blue navigation lights. A second choice for a more compact, less powerful light would be an M600A Scout light with either the incandescent head from the Scout Light IR Kit 01, or the head from the E2E (you can put the Scout Light LED head on your headless E2E and get a good LED handheld light). Ditch the tape switch and use the push button tailcap. Alternately, you can buy a 1” or a 3/4” QD ring and use the 6P or E2E as your weapons light for a lot less money.

Vertical foregrips

The weapons lights without the built in vertical foregrip IMHO, need a foregrip. Again, many people have different tastes, most liking the KAC or one of the copies thereof. I prefer the Dieter CQD, which unfortunately now comes only with the large tape switch cutout. I wish they would get a clue and offer it with no cutout or with a plug for the hole it creates. The best solution I have come up with is a piece of plastic that fits (more or less) in the gap, and a section of inner tube holding it in place.

Slings

I have a sack full of old slings. I used to prefer the Eagle three point slings in the HK set-up, but have gone to the Vickers Blue Force Gear sling and find little about it that I don’t like, other than the price. $50, for a piece of fabric and a couple of buckles? Yikes, someone is getting a big cut! IMHO, the two-point is the way to go, and I do like the fast adjustment pull on it. The single-point is very handy till it pogos and hits you in the face, and the three point slings I have used are constantly getting tangled.

Sling swivels

I used to use the rotating KAC push button sling swivel, till I noticed the amount of time I was regularly spending unwinding the sling. Now I use a fixed side-mount attachment point on the 9:00 forend rail. My current one is the Dieter CQD, but find one you like and go for it.

Lasers

Lasers are cool, if you have a PAQ or PEQ and are using NODs. If not, I really don’t see why you need a laser to point out you to your target, and his friends.

Bipods

Bipods are great on a precision rifle. We have already discussed the fact that a carbine is already a compromise. Why are you packing an extra part which weighs as much as a spare mag, but does nothing 99% of the time other than making the CQB weapon even heavier? Put the bipod on the SPR.

Suppressors

I am a recent convert to suppressors. On the tac carbine, intended for use inside structures or vehicles, it will save your hearing and allows you to hear who else is shooting. For LE, it keeps the blast down in potentially dangerous environments like meth labs, and should minimize hearing and overpressure injuries among officers and potentially innocent bystanders. It is not the silencer of the movies, since the supersonic crack is still loud, but it takes away the muzzle blast, which is significant on a short rifle or carbine. I prefer the SureFire as the most accurate, durable, repeatable suppressor on the market.

Speed loading devices

Some love them, but I do not have a preference for Redi-Mags and other speed loaders. If after 30 rounds you cannot anticipate a reload or find one on your gear, you are not going to fix it with a second mag.

Mags

It is a little late to mention this, but good magazines are the heart of any mag fed weapon. Do not buy USA brand or other commercial mags, stick with the USGI mags. There are a lot of resources on the net comparing the half dozen manufacturers who have made mags for the US military. Rumor is that there are only two sets of M-16 mag tooling, one at Colt and the other with a contractor, The military contract is supposedly a small business set aside, and that after the contractor has the contract for a couple of years, they are no longer small businesses. Regardless, the US GI mags are the best of the aluminum mags. Combined with the new Green issued or Magpul followers and a good quality spring, the US GI mags should run well for a long time if properly maintained. Some prefer the Teflon coating, and some do not. The HK steel mags are very nicely made, and seem to work well for me, but some have mentioned that they are sensitive to being dropped on the lips. That could be a problem for any mag, if you are regularly dropping it loaded onto a hard surface, like concrete. It is worse if it is loaded at the time. Take care of your mags. If they give you any problems that can’t be fixed by cleaning, new springs, or good followers, crush them and toss them. At less than $15 each, AR mags are too inexpensive to take chances on.

Ammo

Use quality ammo. The cheap stuff will eventually bite you with malfunctions or worse yet, a squib. Ask yourself if the pennies you are saving per round are worth blowing up a rifle, or worse yet, taking out an eye. Don’t fall for a false economy. I like US GI surplus Ball, NATO surplus, or Winchester, Federal, or Remington FMJ budget lines.

Summary

Too many people hang too much junk on their weapons. Try to keep a minimalist approach to things. A sight and a light are the starting point for accessories, and could be the final set up as well. Do not add weight to the weapon that you do not need. Two or three minutes in the offhand position holding hard on a target should prove the merits of that. Find what works for you and train hard with it. If you are not using it, think about getting rid of it. Spend the extra money on good mags and ammo. Good luck!

I am sure that there are other accessories out there that I have forgotten, and again, this is just my personal preference. If you start out with the gear I recommend, you will have eliminated most of the expensive mistakes out there and will have something of proven quality to compare the rest against before you buy again.

Hope this was of benefit, or at least spurs some discussion. Happy New Year!

TR
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Old 01-01-2007, 20:28   #4
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Thank you Reaper for the excellant insight and knowledge. I appreciate it.
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Old 01-01-2007, 20:51   #5
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Nice post Boss. This should be copyrighted. I hope the ones who need the info pay attention. (The rest of us are probably already within a normal dispersion pattern given individual preferences.) I do know you've saved me money on gadgets over the years (pays to know somebody willing to test the waters when the new toys come out ). Any addendum from me wouldn't ammount to more than flavor variety, certainly not a significant difference in application/outlook. My .02 - Peregrino
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Old 01-01-2007, 21:39   #6
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Thanks Reaper for combining all this information in one post. I had been reading the old threads here trying to take in all the reviews posted by the BTDT's as a basis for my carbine shopping list.

I had already bookmarked the front sling mount you mentioned in another post but was curious how you had it mounted in the rear?
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Old 01-01-2007, 21:44   #7
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You must have read my mind. I was just about to embark on building my first AR and you answered just about every question I had. Thanks. You just saved me a lot of time and effort trying to figure out who knows what they are talking about and who is clueless over at AR.com.
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Old 01-01-2007, 21:46   #8
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Excellent thread Boss! Outstanding work.
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Old 01-01-2007, 22:10   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonglh
Thanks Reaper for combining all this information in one post. I had been reading the old threads here trying to take in all the reviews posted by the BTDT's as a basis for my carbine shopping list.

I had already bookmarked the front sling mount you mentioned in another post but was curious how you had it mounted in the rear?
You are all most certainly welcome. The New Year seemed to call for a little information sharing.

The Vickers sling mounts through the horizontal slot in the buttstock under the back of the buffer tube. I have the CQD rear receiver mount between the buffer tube and the rear of the receiver, but to use it with the Vickers sling would require a ring or an eye type hook. The sling is very long already attached at the front of the handguard and the rear of the stock. Also, I do not like loose stuff close to the charging handle latch as it is critical that it not become fouled. You know Murphy is waiting, and the first time would be the last time.

TR
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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

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Old 01-01-2007, 22:14   #10
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To echo NDD, excellent thread Sir.

Keep sharing the info and experience. Learning is what I am here for, well that and being a punching bag from time-to-time...

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Old 01-02-2007, 04:10   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Reaper
You are all most certainly welcome. The New Year seemed to call for a little information sharing.
Can we have the New Year 2-3 times a week?
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Old 01-02-2007, 06:13   #12
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Great post!
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Old 01-02-2007, 07:45   #13
x SF med
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"In case you have not detected up to this point, the weapon that I believe provides the optimum mix of reliability, accuracy, ergonomics, and affordability is the AR series. It just feels right in my hand, and will do what I need an assault rifle or carbine to do. Another advantage is that the 7.62 versions " (from Characteristics - page 2 - second paragraph on page)


TR not a sharpshoot - just truly curious what's supposed to follow this, seems to have gotten cut off. Please finish it, inquiring minds want to know!!!

Outstanding post.
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Too many people are looking for a magic bullet. As always, shot placement is the key. ~TR
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Old 01-02-2007, 12:32   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x SF med
"In case you have not detected up to this point, the weapon that I believe provides the optimum mix of reliability, accuracy, ergonomics, and affordability is the AR series. It just feels right in my hand, and will do what I need an assault rifle or carbine to do. Another advantage is that the 7.62 versions " (from Characteristics - page 2 - second paragraph on page)


TR not a sharpshoot - just truly curious what's supposed to follow this, seems to have gotten cut off. Please finish it, inquiring minds want to know!!!

Outstanding post.
Sorry, I had to cut and paste it to fit and I must have dropped that part. Good catch!

"...the 7.62 versions use exactly the same controls and muscle memory to operate, and in some cases, even parts are interchangable. Thus everything from a dedicated shorty like the CQB-R to an M-4, to an SPR, to an M-16, to a 7.62 shorty, to a mid-length 7.62 carbine, to a Mark 11, Mod 0 7.62 sniper rifle works almost exactly the same, allowing transition for what is essentially an SMG all the way through a dedicated sniper rifle without relearning a new manual of arms and set of controls that are significantly different. Pick it up and if you are familiar with one, you can run any of them just as well."

HTH.

TR
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Old 01-02-2007, 16:06   #15
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Reaper,

Excellent post!

It took me quite a bit of time and experimentation to figure out what you so adeptly stated in just three short pages. A very well written summation.
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