Old 12-25-2013, 12:58   #1
GratefulCitizen
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Striped bass

Never been much into fishing.
Don't have much context to know what people like.

I was surprised to see restrictions on striped bass in some parts of the country.
We have the opposite problem here.

There are too many stripers in Lake Powell.
We need anglers to keep them under control.

They can be fished here without limit, and it is encouraged.
An estimated 1 million were harvested from the lake last year.
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Old 12-25-2013, 20:10   #2
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East Coast Striper populations were heavily fished along with pollution issues in the Chesapeake Bay seriously diminished the striper stocks.
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Old 12-25-2013, 20:22   #3
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Never been much into fishing.
Don't have much context to know what people like.

I was surprised to see restrictions on striped bass in some parts of the country.
We have the opposite problem here.

There are too many stripers in Lake Powell.
We need anglers to keep them under control.

They can be fished here without limit, and it is encouraged.
An estimated 1 million were harvested from the lake last year.
Are they safe to eat?
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Old 12-25-2013, 20:48   #4
GratefulCitizen
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Are they safe to eat?
Depends on how much and where you catch them.
The State of Utah has some wide margins on their safety recommendations.

Some recent recommendations:
http://www.fishadvisories.utah.gov/d...yfactsheet.pdf
http://fishadvisories.utah.gov/docs/...ethodology.pdf

Probably also matters how old/big the fish is.
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Old 12-25-2013, 21:12   #5
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A prime game fish here in NJ, totally controlled fishery, known for their fight and incredible taste. Cooked properly, they flake like Halibut with the same delicate taste; wonderful with Tomato, Nicoise Olives, and EVO.
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Old 12-26-2013, 05:48   #6
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Striper fishing is a blast. We have a decent population here in a couple of lakes. Last year some friends and I traveled to Lake Texoma to Striper fish, and caught a ton. Huge fish that fight really hard. They are the alpha predator of a lot of freshwater lakes.

Striper is some of the best table-fare fish you will find. You just have to either cut or tear the red streak out of the meat. If frying a big fish, cut the filet into strips about the size of a large finger. Cleaning a big Striper is like cleaning a small hog. Our guide goes through electric filet knives fast.

Striper fishing requires heavy duty gear. Last time we went, we were throwing 20-lb test spider wire line, with huge ugly stick rods. Still, the stripers were a handful to get into the boat. Some friends have been catching some really big stripers (40-50lb range) at a nearby lake. They are throwing baits that are approximately 10-inches long.
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Old 12-26-2013, 07:58   #7
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Depends on how much and where you catch them.
The State of Utah has some wide margins on their safety recommendations.


Probably also matters how old/big the fish is.
The age does mater, older fish have had more time to accumulate the toxins.

As there is an over population, I would ask if there is any commercial effort to catch & sell the stripers. If not, it's probably because of the toxins.

The fisheries in the Florida bay and reefs of the Keys also have considerable toxin problems.. I have cut back from 2-3 times a week, to less than 1's a month..



Having said that, the test methods and verification process is wrought with tree-hugger bureaucratic tax sucking scumbag o2-stealing leeches, aka NOAA

Who do you trust??

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Old 12-26-2013, 09:57   #8
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As there is an over population, I would ask if there is any commercial effort to catch & sell the stripers. If not, it's probably because of the toxins.
Tourist destination.
Using anglers to control population is a planned part of management.

The Utah fish guy (Wayne Gustaveson) has been here for nearly 40 years.
One of his older articles: http://wildlife.utah.gov/blog/2009/when-the-lake-boils/
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Old 12-26-2013, 13:40   #9
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Man - I could write a book on Stripers. I grew up on Cape Cod and started catching them on a handline when I was about 8, (would handline a rig trolling off the back of a row boat).

Size limit back then was 16 inches and no limit on numbers. Saw the decline of the fishery through the '80's and '90's and the inch limit hit 36 inches with a one-keeper policy in Massachusetts. I was at JRTC at that time and would fish in LA and TX. Caught a monster Striper (possibly at Powell) one day and it was "only" 37 inches. Tossed it back as I thought it too small. The locals 'bout scalped me and ran me off.

I like to load up on Fly rod(s); spinning; trolling with mono and wire line and try to catch a striper on each. My favorite is jigging the rips off Monomoy (between Chatham and Nantucket). Have a GREAT time and a LOT of fun. However, the seals have moved in during the last 8-10 years and put a hurt on the fishery. I ended up selling my boat when last at Meade and haven't been up there to fish in few years.

The kids are old enough to want to go slay some fish up at Grandma's so next summer I'll pull out all the gear and head to the Cape to teach them some spinning and fly-fishing.

Absolutely great sportfish!!
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Old 12-26-2013, 23:55   #10
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Depends on how much and where you catch them.
The State of Utah has some wide margins on their safety recommendations.

Some recent recommendations:
http://www.fishadvisories.utah.gov/d...yfactsheet.pdf
http://fishadvisories.utah.gov/docs/...ethodology.pdf

Probably also matters how old/big the fish is.
That's what I figured....... you cannot eat the fish you catch in Arizona......... they will kill you........
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Old 03-21-2014, 22:01   #11
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That's what I figured....... you cannot eat the fish you catch in Arizona......... they will kill you........
Had a delivery to the fish hatchery a couple days ago and chatted with the guy who runs it.
He's not worried about the stripers being toxic and eats plenty (properly prepared).

He also said that Wayne Gustaveson (Lake Powell state fish guy for the last 40 years) wasn't concerned about mercury levels and didn't consider a warning necessary, but that decision was made by others.
A new sample was recently caught and the results should be published within a month or so.

The bigger concern now is quagga mussels -- they're in Powell to stay.
Maybe 10 more good years before infestation levels start choking the food chain.

The sandstone and severe water level changes may help keep them at bay.
Redear sunfish may be stocked and there's promise showing in some new microbe which selectively kills quagga.

Don't know if these measures will work.
If anyone wants to enjoy the abundant striper fishing in Powell, they should come within the next decade.

I'll asked Wayne more about these issues next time I run into him.
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Old 03-21-2014, 22:07   #12
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That's what I figured....... you cannot eat the fish you catch in Arizona......... they will kill you........
So catch and release, they are great sportfish
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Old 03-22-2014, 15:14   #13
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He's not worried about the stripers being toxic and eats plenty (properly prepared)..
Montana has problems too with past mining and certain species of fish. (Bottom fish are more prone to toxins)

You can eat plenty...
1) Eat the small ones - they taste better too. (guppies in Montana - under 11 inches)
2) Cut the fat off and cook on grill or stick not a pan - Most of the toxins are in the Fat and tan stuff (see below)
3) Scrape the tan colored stuff off that follows along the spinal cord after cooking (or cut it off before)

Generally Rainbows and Brook Trout are the safest - don't know about the Apache Trout in AZ...yet
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Old 03-22-2014, 17:36   #14
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That's what I figured....... you cannot eat the fish you catch in Arizona......... they will kill you........
That is very sad to hear, such a great tasting fish. When I was living on the Chesapeak Bay, I would start early and catch some Spot and/or Croaker in Fleets Bay, to use for bait. I would then motor around Windmill Point, and start to troll up the Rappahannock about a mile from the bay. I had a boat license, and could take two per person. Always a great day!
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