Old 04-10-2015, 09:32   #1
AtAllCosts
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Flat Feet and SFAS

Short version: I'd like to hear your experiences with flat feet and plantar fasciitis and how/if you managed any and all of it.

Long Version: I went to Podiatry today (the only snag in my SFAS physical) where I was told that my right foot is extremely flat, causing weakness in the ankle, and as a result, run a severe disadvantage and slight risk if I want to attend SFAS. I'm fine with a disadvantage, people with flat feet get selected all the time I'm sure. But I'd like to hear ways I could possibly minimize risk of injury and as work on pain management if at all possible.

I've been prescribed custom orthotics, but the Doc was sort of a downer, saying while it wouldn't really help, it would keep it from getting worse. However, he did say he was going to do everything he could to help and even ordered a CT scan to get a better look. Nonetheless, I appreciate his overall medical expertise.

I have a feeling I'm going to end up sucking it up and dealing with it, which is fine.

Anyway, back on track. Have you known anyone with flat feet issues bad enough to affect the way they ruck/run? How did they manage it? Any tips?

Thanks for your time, gentleman.
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Old 04-10-2015, 09:43   #2
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I've had flat feet all of my adult life.

I succeeded in-spite of this because I didn't know any better.
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Old 04-10-2015, 16:19   #3
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I've had flat feet all of my adult life.

I succeeded in-spite of this because I didn't know any better.
Don't listen to him, the pain centers in his brain have been rewired to "enjoy the suck"......
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Old 04-11-2015, 09:31   #4
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I have had flat feet all of my life. Like MR2, I guess I just didn't know any better. In the last decade plus I have had knee and SI joint issues as a result of some of the joint instability caused by flat feet. For the last four years I've worn custom orthotics. What your podiatrist says about them preventing further damage is true. And at 58, it's all about preservation.

But I would go a step further and say it has resolved most of my knee issues and I no longer have SI joint problems. I no longer run more than 3-4 miles, but I no longer hurt afterwards. The brand I have is called "FootLevelers." I really wish I'd gone this route sooner. Good luck!
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Old 04-13-2015, 07:02   #5
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I was told that my feet are so flat that I would not have been a draft candidate during previous wars.

I managed to make it through SFAS on the first try. I _did_ have a stress fx on the final march, though... And I have had occasional problems with achilles tendonitis...

No one is perfect. I've had plenty of teammates with bad backs, bad knees, etc...

Train smart.
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Old 04-13-2015, 07:59   #6
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A 20k ruck through rocks and sand is causing me some real pain today. My right ankle feels like it took a sledgehammer hit.

But, like Rich was saying, I could probably train a little smarter. Maybe I could ramp up to that sort of distance and terrain over the course of a few months. Maybe that'll ease the pain a bit.
Also, my custom orthotics haven't come yet. I have it ingrained in my mind that it's going to fix all my problems, and while I know that's unreasonable, maybe it'll create a placebo effect.

I don't know the ruck distances and how often they occur in SFAS, but if it's anything like I suspect (15k - 20k movements daily), then I could be in trouble.

I appreciate the wisdom gentleman. Thanks for your time.

-Mike
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Old 04-13-2015, 09:25   #7
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You are probably as young and fit as you are ever going to be.

By the time you are 35, you will not be able to ruck with any real sort of weight.

Speaking as an old guy, I cherish my experiences, but wish I had taken a little better care of my body when I was younger, and at least skipped the stupid / abusive stuff. There is the "weakness leaving your body" hurt, and there is the "you are breaking something important" pain. Sometimes, you learn the difference too late. Don't wear yourself out too soon, you will have the rest of your life to live with the consequences of your choices.

Rolling an ankle and breaking down in the Hindu Kush in the middle of a firefight is not going to do your teammates, or your situation much good.

Best of luck.

TR
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Old 06-23-2015, 14:09   #8
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Just a small update.

Been training with my custom inserts for about two months now. I will never train without them again as long as I can help it. Most, if not all, pain in my right ankle has stopped, my blister count has decreased to almost a point of non-existence, and my running form (which was visually relative to a penguin high on bath salts) has self-corrected, shaving entire minutes off my times for my five mile and a full minute off of my two.

Maybe it's a placebo effect, maybe it really did help... I just feel better. If you're preparing to go and you're on the edge about orthotic inserts, do it. You will not regret it, and it's well worth the effort. You take care of your body and your body can take care of you. I see that now.

I appreciate your wisdom gentleman, I really do. Thanks for what you do.

Back to PT.

-Mike
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Old 06-23-2015, 15:37   #9
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Originally Posted by AtAllCosts View Post
Just a small update.

Been training with my custom inserts for about two months now. I will never train without them again as long as I can help it. Most, if not all, pain in my right ankle has stopped, my blister count has decreased to almost a point of non-existence, and my running form (which was visually relative to a penguin high on bath salts) has self-corrected, shaving entire minutes off my times for my five mile and a full minute off of my two.

Maybe it's a placebo effect, maybe it really did help... I just feel better. If you're preparing to go and you're on the edge about orthotic inserts, do it. You will not regret it, and it's well worth the effort. You take care of your body and your body can take care of you. I see that now.

I appreciate your wisdom gentleman, I really do. Thanks for what you do.

Back to PT.

-Mike
Having your feet properly aligned physiologically will realign everything up stream, good inserts like Superfeet have saved many an injury to SF guys over the years.
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