Go Back   Professional Soldiers > Special Forces Weapons > Edged Weapons

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-07-2006, 11:41   #1
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
Advanced Sharpening Notes

Just finished hand sharpening some of our knives that have been out in the "sand" made from the CPM S-30V steel.

Two things, first I use WD-40 on the long Norton Fine India stone clamped onto the bench top, this has previously been stated on this forum but it's very important to note this part:

Stop during sharpening to use more WD-40 to clean the abraded particles out of the stone. This is to keep the stone cutting at the best possible "rate of removal".

While we have some WD-40 on the stone, I observed I was watching the little "wave" of the WD moving along just forward of the edge that was in contact with the stone.

Yes I said that correctly, "observed I was watching".

This is how I tell what part of the curved edge is in contact with the stone and let's me know when to stop at the tip so I don't over sharpen or "round off" the point of the blade.

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 07-07-2006 at 11:57.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2006, 13:49   #2
x SF med
Quiet Professional
 
x SF med's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: In transit somewhere
Posts: 4,044
Mr Harsey-
When can I take your sharpening class(es)? Your insights amaze me, I can keep a blade fairly sharp, but you make them sing...
__________________
In the business of war, there is no invariable stategic advantage (shih) which can be relied upon at all times.
Sun-Tzu, "The Art of Warfare"

Hearing, I forget. Seeing, I remember. Writing (doing), I understand. Chinese Proverb

Too many people are looking for a magic bullet. As always, shot placement is the key. ~TR
x SF med is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2006, 17:16   #3
The Reaper
Quiet Professional
 
The Reaper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Free Pineland
Posts: 24,477
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harsey
This is how I tell what part of the curved edge is in contact with the stone and let's me know when to stop at the tip so I don't over sharpen or "round off" the point of the blade.
That is my problem.

I can get the edge right but I round the tips.

I always have to go back and repoint the tip, which is then uneven.

'Course, I don't have one o' them fancy bench stones.

Got plenty of WD-40 though!

TR
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
The Reaper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2006, 21:23   #4
BrianH
Quiet Professional
 
BrianH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Angel Gate
Posts: 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by x_sf_med
Mr Harsey-
When can I take your sharpening class(es)? Your insights amaze me, I can keep a blade fairly sharp, but you make them sing...
Ditto.

I'm starting to make excuses to my girlfriend why I would have to take a pilgrimage to the Northwest that doesn't involve guns or knives.

Bill, there's some great fishing up there, right?
__________________
Pain, or damage, don't end the world. Or despair. Or fucking beatin's. The world ends when you're dead. Until then, you got more punishment in store.

Stand it like a man... and give some back.
BrianH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2006, 07:01   #5
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by x_sf_med
Mr Harsey-
When can I take your sharpening class(es)? Your insights amaze me, I can keep a blade fairly sharp, but you make them sing...
If you get close to this neighborhood, your a welcome guest in the shop and we can work on sharpening.

TR, You need me to find a stone for you?

BrianH, The fishing up here is one reason to keep knives sharp.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2006, 14:25   #6
BrianH
Quiet Professional
 
BrianH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Angel Gate
Posts: 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harsey
TR, You need me to find a stone for you?
I don't know about TR, but THIS GUY needs you to find a stone for him
__________________
Pain, or damage, don't end the world. Or despair. Or fucking beatin's. The world ends when you're dead. Until then, you got more punishment in store.

Stand it like a man... and give some back.
BrianH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2006, 11:11   #7
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
The Sharpening Stone

The one single stone I use the most for knife work here is made by Norton and is called the Crystolan/India Combo. It's an eleven inch long double sided stone, medium silicon carbide on one side and fine aluminum oxide on the other.
Current price on this stone from Tru Grit is 36.25 US plus shipping.

If you can't get something sharp with this, you need a belt grinder.

Here's the contact: Tru Grit Inc., (trugrit.com) in Ontario, California.
Phone: 909-923-4116

Tru Grit are great folks and are very good to deal with.
They supply all of Chris Reeve Knives and my grinding belts and other abrasives like stones.

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 07-10-2006 at 13:01.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 09:32   #8
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
Looking, Seeing

One of the subtle problems sharpening any knife, especially the thicker tactical or hard use type blades is that we do a whole lot of sharpening and the knife isn't getting sharp.
Sometimes it's tempting to change the angle to make the knife sharpen out to the edge faster. This can be a mistake because it blunts off the leading edge and this makes the knife not cut as well as it could, and makes it harder for us to maintain a sharp knife in the long run.

Try using some magnification to look and see what part of the edge your working on.

Here is my point, often we don't need to change anything we are doing while sharpening but only need to keep doing the same thing a while longer to get very good results.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 09:53   #9
The Reaper
Quiet Professional
 
The Reaper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Free Pineland
Posts: 24,477
Bill:

If I could elaborate afrom an amateur perspective, that angle is one of the reasons that I have suggested carefully marking the sharpened portion of the edge with a Sharpie or some other marker to see how much you are taking off and where.

If as you sharpen, you see the color of the marked edge is not being removed uniformly, you are changing the edge geometry.

On a really good knife that comes sharp, the factory edge is probably where it needs to be to do what the blade is designed for. The edge geometry on an axe will not be the same edge as a machete, or a pocket knife, or a straight razor. Most good sharpeners have the ability to change edge angles to suit the design of the individual piece. It might even have a compound angle, or serrations, which can be a real bear to maintain.

Once you have the right angle for sharpening the individual blade, try to maintain it during the remainder of your sharpening.

HTH.

TR
__________________
"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
The Reaper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 12:01   #10
BamBam
Quiet Professional
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 209
Advance sharpening notes......................hell, now you reallly want me to hurt myself.
__________________
Billy C .
Here I am with visions and the rest of the world's wearing bifocals.
BamBam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 12:24   #11
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
TR,
Your correct about using the magic marker on the edge, this does help.
When sharpening I stop and look for the fresh abrasion marks and have gotten used to "reading" those.

Bam Bam, just trying to help.
The old saying "a dull knife will hurt you worse than a sharp one" wasn't penned by anyone around this shop.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 18:31   #12
inbredyokel
Asset
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 12
At the risk of....

...sounding completely bone (dumb), I use a kitchen devil for knives and on my multitool...it doesn't get a knife or blade razors enough for shaving, but its certainly good enough for government work, and it takes ten seconds to use.
Or would that be like cheating or something?
I'm all for the easy option...

Harsey here, "Lightly edited by me for the delicate ears that may inhabit this place".

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 07-12-2006 at 18:49.
inbredyokel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 18:43   #13
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
[QUOTE=inbredyokel]...sounding completely bone (dumb), I use a kitchen devil for knives and on my multitool...it doesn't get a knife or blade razors enough for shaving, but its certainly good enough for government work, and it takes ten seconds to use.
Or would that be like cheating or something?
I'm all for the easy option...

Good Sir, What is the Kitchen Devil? I may have some thoughts on this.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2006, 19:12   #14
inbredyokel
Asset
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 12
Its a small knife sharpener I bought in a supermarket from the area that girls buy all of their recreational toys from- you know where you find the rolling pins, irons, cooking utensils and the like.
It has a small U shaped plastic handle with two metal spokes in a cruciform at its top.
It looks a bit like this:

X
U

Hold in left hand, place knife in the point where the metal spokes cross and pull across till satisfied.

I've never had to use more than a few steady strong wrist actions to achieve a good end result.
inbredyokel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2006, 08:18   #15
Bill Harsey
Bladesmith to the Quiet Professionals
 
Bill Harsey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon, Land of the Silver Grey Sunsets
Posts: 3,871
inbredyokel,
I found it via Google. If I'm reading correctly, the actual sharpening surface of the sticks are steel(s)?
Those look good for light touch up work on thin ground blades.
Bill Harsey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 22:27.



Copyright 2004-2019 by Professional Soldiers
Site Designed, Maintained, & Hosted by Hilliker Technologies