Old 11-22-2013, 07:32   #16
PedOncoDoc
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I don't believe it changes with different hand dominances. I'm a lefty and I have had eye reading used on me. Should be universal.
Hand dominance would be less influential on this than brain-sidedness, although I admittedly know little on the topic of eye reading.

A majority of left-handed are still left-brain dominant.
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Old 11-27-2013, 15:57   #17
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"Eye reading," this typically is what most think of along with the the different links I posted.

Does it change for different handed people?

What about cultures?

My understanding is that this chart has more or less been discredited. (I'm not an expert. I've just sat through some classes and been told to forget some of the popular notions about detecting lies, including the looking in certain directions, etc.)

-----------------------------------------------

I've had training in reading "microexpressions," which are quick (as short at 1/16th of a second) facial movements that portray seven universal human emotions. (Anger, contempt, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, surprise)

The training was based on the work of Paul Ekman, PhD.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Ekman

The idea is that even when a subject is trying to deceive you, he may subconsciously perform a micro-expression that belies one of those seven emotions, and that in turn may indicate a 'hot spot' or possible deception.

There are some web based training programs that let you practice spotting the micro-expressions. www.humintell.com is the one I have experience with. You do need to practice recognizing these microexpressions. You aren't likely to pick up these without some formal study.

Ekman has a few books out. That might be a good place to start if this interests you.

These seven emotions are supposed to cross cultural lines, and reading microexpressions should work with any culture.

Last edited by Leozinho; 11-29-2013 at 09:39. Reason: corrected error by replacing 'deception' with 'contempt'
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Old 11-28-2013, 08:56   #18
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[QUOTE=Leozinho;531547]My understanding is that this chart has more or less been discredited. (I'm not an expert. I've just sat through some classes and been told to forget some of the popular notions about detecting lies, including the looking in certain directions, etc.)/QUOTE]
Yes to a point, from my understanding it is more in the professional fields. They people that need to lie, and if caught, interviewed, integrated, etc most know this. In my personal experiences, it works, but you must get a baseline from the subject. Culture plays into a lot of this body language stuff.

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Originally Posted by Leozinho View Post
I've had training in reading "microexpressions," which are quick (as short at 1/16th of a second) facial movements that portray seven universal human emotions. (Anger, deception, disgust, fear, joy, sadness, surprise)

The training was based on the work of Paul Ekman, PhD.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Ekman

The idea is that even when a subject is trying to deceive you, he may subconsciously perform a micro-expression that belies one of those seven emotions, and that in turn may indicate a 'hot spot' or possible deception.

There are some web based training programs that let you practice spotting the micro-expressions. www.humintell.com is the one I have experience with. You do need to practice recognizing these microexpressions. You aren't likely to pick up these without some formal study.

Ekman has a few books out. That might be a good place to start if this interests you.

These seven emotions are supposed to cross cultural lines, and reading microexpressions should work with any culture.
I have never heard of him, but what I Googled and viewed on ******* I liked. I saved two video of him. Thanks.
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Old 11-29-2013, 09:38   #19
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FYI - I made a mistake in my list of seven universal human emotions.

Contempt (not deception) is one of the seven universal human emotions.

MtnGoat - Glad you found that interesting.

History buffs might appreciate this. In the class we watched a clip of Ekman analyzing a video of Kim Philby denying being the infamous 'Third Man' (with Burgess and Maclean.)

http://www.*******.com/watch?v=N2A2g-qRIaU

At :39-42 of the video above you watch Philby denying being the Third Man, and a split second later you see clearly see a very slight grin on his face (microexpression of joy, which Ekman calls Duping Delight - the thrill of lying.)

Philby, of course, had been spying for the USSR since the 30s and would later defect to the USSR.

(I couldn't find the clip of Ekman analyzing Philby, but it might be out there. Seemed like if was from a TV show.)
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Old 12-03-2013, 02:04   #20
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great stuff here.

Another good one:
Definitive Book of Body Language by Barbara and Allan Pease
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Old 12-03-2013, 02:12   #21
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Der, der Geld verliert, verliert einiges;
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Old 12-21-2013, 07:36   #22
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Along the same lines

I just found this this morning.

Someone in the FBI placed a classified interrogation manual into the library of congress, copyrighted under his name.

Does this mean it has been released into public domain and is still there?

Quote:
In a lapse that national security experts call baffling, a high-ranking FBI agent filed a sensitive internal manual detailing the bureau's secret interrogation procedures with the Library of Congress, where anyone with a library card can read it.

For years, the American Civil Liberties Union fought a legal battle to force the FBI to release a range of documents concerning FBI guidelines, including this one, which covers the practices agents are supposed to employ when questioning suspects. Through all this, unbeknownst to the ACLU and the FBI, the manual sat in a government archive open to the public. When the FBI finally relented and provided the ACLU a version of the interrogation guidebook last year, it was heavily redacted; entire pages were blacked out. But the version available at the Library of Congress, which a Mother Jones reporter reviewed last week, contains no redactions.

The 70-plus-page manual ended up in the Library of Congress, thanks to its author, an FBI official who made an unexplainable mistake. This FBI supervisory special agent, who once worked as a unit chief in the FBI's counterterrorism division, registered a copyright for the manual in 2010 and deposited a copy with the US Copyright Office, where members of the public can inspect it upon request. What's particularly strange about this episode is that government documents cannot be copyrighted.

"A document that has not been released does not even need a copyright," says Steven Aftergood, a government secrecy expert at the Federation of American Scientists. "Who is going to plagiarize from it? Even if you wanted to, you couldn't violate the copyright because you don't have the document. It isn't available."

"The whole thing is a comedy of errors," he adds. "It sounds like gross incompetence and ignorance."

Julian Sanchez, a fellow with the libertarian Cato Institute who has studied copyright policy, was harsher: "Do they not cover this in orientation? [Sensitive] documents should not be placed in public repositories—and, by the way, aren't copyrightable. How do you even get a clearance without knowing this stuff?"

The FBI agent who registered for the copyright did so under his own name—effectively claiming the rights for himself, not the FBI. An FBI spokesman told Mother Jones the bureau has been made aware of the matter but "cannot provide any further information at this time regarding this subject."

The version of the interrogation manual the agent deposited with the copyright office is dated August 18, 2008, but it wasn't filed until January 2010. The redacted version released to the ACLU is dated February 23, 2011.

Because the two versions are similar, a side-by-side comparison allows a reader to deduce what was redacted in the later version. The copyright office does not allow readers to take pictures or notes, but during a brief inspection, a few redactions stood out.

The ACLU has previously criticized the interrogation manual for endorsing the isolation of detainees and including favorable references to the KUBARK manual, a 1963 CIA interrogation guidebook that encouraged torture methods, including electric shocks. The group has also expressed concern that the manual adopts aspects of the Reid Technique, a common law enforcement interview method that has been known to produce false confessions. A redacted sentence in the manual says the document is intended for use by the FBI's "clean" teams—investigators who collect information intended for use in federal prosecutions. That raises the question of whether teams collecting information that's not for use in federal courts would have to follow the manual's (already permissive) guidelines at all.

Another section, blacked out in the version provided to the ACLU, encourages FBI agents to stage a "date-stamped full-body picture" of a detainee, complete with a bottle of water, for use in refuting abuse allegations at trial.

Yet the most eyebrow-raising thing about the unredacted version may be that it was available for public consumption for years. The inadvertent release of sensitive information "is not supposed to happen but it does," Aftergood says. "Security screwups are not very uncommon. But this is a first."
http://www.motherjones.com/politics/...dacted-secrets
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Old 12-29-2013, 14:25   #23
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I just found this this morning.

Someone in the FBI placed a classified interrogation manual into the library of congress, copyrighted under his name.

Does this mean it has been released into public domain and is still there?



http://www.motherjones.com/politics/...dacted-secrets
Seems like this will become the new norm. Your pissed at your Country, let's release something in a way that will CMA (CYA).
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