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Old 09-16-2004, 19:01   #31
Razor
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I've done some high flying with the other Latrobe product as well.
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Old 09-16-2004, 20:06   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razor
I've done some high flying with the other Latrobe product as well.
I got it, Razor.

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
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Old 09-16-2004, 20:33   #33
Bill Harsey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razor
I've done some high flying with the other Latrobe product as well.
Fully understood and only one question to follow. Does "Rolling Rock Extra Pale" count? Have some of those empties within 100 ft. of here.

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 09-16-2004 at 20:34. Reason: not an MIT Grad
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Old 09-17-2004, 07:51   #34
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Welder made into charger

No way I can top The Reapers opening story here, that's just plain brilliant. Along that line here is one I've personally done. I was driving the shop truck up to the logging side one morning and the truck died when I'd stopped to get on the Mt. Hood highway. Engine wouldn't re-start due to now dead battery and we had a logging crew waiting for me to get there. I opened the back of the truck, started the portable welder, made damn sure it was switched to DC power and ran the welding leads forward to the battery. I also turned the amperage way down at the welder first. About this time a guy in a pickup stopped to ask if I needed help, I said thanks but I've got it. He stayed where he was to see what would happen. I put the welder ground lead on the battery ground post and clamped the welders stinger to the positive post, just like jumper cables. The truck started fine and made it all the way to work. Yes I turned off the welder and wrapped up the leads before driving off. That other guy drove off shaking his head. *****DISCLAIMER*****EMERGENCY USE ONLY*****THIS MAY NOT TURN OUT WELL*****DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME!!!

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 09-17-2004 at 16:00. Reason: I'm not an MIT grad
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Old 09-17-2004, 08:21   #35
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Welder DC Power

Brief word about welders, electric arc welders (stick welders) have differant available power outputs to the welding leads. Some are Alternating Current (AC), others are Direct Current (DC), some welders have both outputs that can be changed by where you plug in the leads or turn the switch. If you ever use the welder for a battery charger IT HAS TO BE DC CAPABLE!!! , make sure you know what the leads are plugged into. Ground clamp needs to be plugged into the ground (negative) at the welder and the stinger is Positive. Operators of welders may change these back and forth in DC welding depending on what type of rod they are welding with. Some welding rods are run with the stinger negative and the ground clamp positive. "DC Reverse Polarity" is a common welding term and refers exactly to what I've already described, ground lead is negative, stinger that holds the welding rod is positive. This is what you want. Be sure of this before you try to make a welder work as an emergency battery charger. *****DISCLAIMER! *****Emergency Use only***** HIGH RISK of this not working out well. DO NOY TRY THIS AT HOME!

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 09-17-2004 at 16:01. Reason: reader may not be an MIT grad and actually try this
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Old 09-17-2004, 08:39   #36
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When you said, " He stayed where he was to see what would happen," is it safe to assume 'where he was' means at least 100ft away from you and the truck?
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Old 09-17-2004, 08:50   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razor
When you said, " He stayed where he was to see what would happen," is it safe to assume 'where he was' means at least 100ft away from you and the truck?
LOL! He wasn't that smart, but he did stay in his rig with the window up.
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Old 09-17-2004, 09:00   #38
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First, I want to reiterate that these are emergency techniques and should not be attempted by personnel without extensive training and experience.

We need a legal disclaimer here, AL & RL, Esqs.

Having said that, here is my next RE solution.

You can make a decent hidden blank adapter for the M-16/M-4 in an emergency by cutting a 5.56 case off just above the base, and punching out the primer. Then you remove the flash suppressor and install the cutdown case, centered, concave side toward the barrel, retightening the flash suppressor.

Two problems with this are that the adapter will not blow off, but will blow the weapon up if a live round is fired, and on a lesser note, the flash suppressor may unscrew itself if not properly tightened.

I also understand that clear fingernail polish (good for chigger bites) makes a decent RE substitute for Loc-Tite. Hopefully, married guys have a better access to nail polish than single gents. FS probably has the market cornered.

TR
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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

De Oppresso Liber 01/20/2017
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Old 09-17-2004, 23:40   #39
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This is way more redneck than S/F engeneering, but here it goes. We had a hole digger die in the hole (Ford engine), and the gear that engaged the flywheel from the starter was stripped. We removed the stripped gear and turned it around, so the "good" side engaged the flywheel. It started and got us stacked out, it even lasted untill I left that company.
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Old 09-18-2004, 07:27   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polar Bear 4/31
This is way more redneck than S/F engeneering, but here it goes. We had a hole digger die in the hole (Ford engine), and the gear that engaged the flywheel from the starter was stripped. We removed the stripped gear and turned it around, so the "good" side engaged the flywheel. It started and got us stacked out, it even lasted untill I left that company.
Polar Bear, Don't tell anyone this but I have an old metal cutting bandsaw in the shop that's still running today after doing the exact same thing to the spur gear in the transmission drive box about 10 years ago. I also have a back up bandsaw just like it and use both all the time. Good thinking!
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Old 09-18-2004, 10:01   #41
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Hard to start, common problem. On a Drop Zone we ran both of the Batteries down on the DC-3. My uncle had been an old '3 Pilot and Mechanic and had told me a tale that I really had not believed, but it worked. I took a long piece of tubular nylon, folded it in half and hooked the V around one of the prop blades. After making about 4 wraps around the Prop Dome, I attached the free ends to the bumper of a truck. After having the pilot prime it and with a GOOD shot of ether in the intake, I took off with the truck ! It took 2 tries, but I got it started. We refueled "hot" all day and only shut it down that evening. Made a bunch of jumps that day.
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Old 09-18-2004, 19:10   #42
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Speaking of Hard To Start...

One day logging up the Clackamas River in the Mt. Hood National Forest, the batteries went dead on the Caterpillar D-7, and it couldn't be restarted. When I shut down for lunch I parked the D-7 in third gear, with the blade up, on a hill so steep I almost couldn't get off of the machine and had little confidence of the Cat still being there when I was done eating but damnit, I was hungry. After lunch I managed to get the brake dogs released and pushed the clutch in, that sumbitch took off down the hill and I pulled full force back on the clutch lever, she turned over a few times and caught fire. I logged the rest of the day. Roll starting a cat takes a pretty good slope but it can be done.

Last edited by Bill Harsey; 09-19-2004 at 07:45. Reason: I can't spell
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Old 09-18-2004, 19:31   #43
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Good thing Mr. D9 wasn't there; he would have simply put the poor 'dozer out of its misery.
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Old 09-19-2004, 00:03   #44
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This thread has a lot of potential! To add my two bits - I spent a lot of time on SF dive teams where we had to do a fair amount of maintenance and construction. To make it easier we "acquired" a few air tools and nailguns because they made it more efficient for a couple of guys to do the construction while the rest of the team did other work. (We usually had more OPFUND than bodies and the work always had to get done.) Unfortunately the TO&E and a couple commanders without a sense of humor wouldn't support us acquiring and keeping a low pressure compressor to run the tools. Since we always had plenty of compressors producing high-pressure air for diving we used the dive tanks and dedicated an "unserviceable" diving regulator to run the tools/nailguns. It requires an investment in the equipment and a little pre-planning but its highly portable, doesn't require electricity, and saves a lot of effort when something has to be done right now. The only caution is to make sure the regulator's intermediate pressure is adjusted low enough that it won't damage the tools. Normal intermediate pressure is 135 +/- 5 psi. Most tools prefer something below 90 psi. The Conshelf XII/XIV made/makes an excellent regulator for this use because it's cheap, readilly available in pawn shops (you didn't think I was going to use my breathing regulator for this?), and the pressure can be adjusted without opening it up. There are some inexpensive adapters required to hook a 1/4" airline to the regulator but any dive shop can get them for you (got to love the IMPACT credit card!). We discovered that keeping the regulator set at factory specs with at least a 25' air hose and a mini "in-line" regulator next to the tool made for better flow rates (tools are bigger "air-hogs" than most military divers - especially if they're in continuous use). We've built a few SOCEPs in the middle of nowhere with some battery operated saws/drills and the nailgun hooked up to a SCUBA tank. Because I'm still into diving and have access to the HP air I've set up a similar system for my personal use that includes an air chuck and impact wrench for changing tires on the road. I've also used it on small carpentry jobs to run my finish nailer when I didn't want to lug around a full size compressor. The tanks support a surprising amount of work. FWIW - Peregrino
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Old 09-19-2004, 07:54   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Razor
Good thing Mr. D9 wasn't there; he would have simply put the poor 'dozer out of its misery.
Razor, Your right, he'd be a little expensive to have around the logging outfit. Peregrino! That's some tricky rigging you did there, I noted the length of airhose you use to act as a buffer for the tools. Good Lessons in there guys and girls.
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