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Old 03-10-2010, 16:49   #16
Mack
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Originally Posted by swatsurgeon View Post
Mack,
The only difference between the two is the addition of a 'potential' hemostatic agent...it is not a miracle worker, just an adjunct. Why not carry something that does offer 1% more potential to stop bleeding....just trying to figure out the rationale people use for what they carry.....not a criticism of you at all.
ss
Hey SwatSurgeon. Good question. A couple reasons I'd rather use kerlix...1-Kerlix is much easier to open with one hand (one hand holding pressure, other hand opening and applying gauze). 2-I didn't notice an improvement in acheiving hemostasis with the Combat Gauze vs Kerlix. Obviously, you have more experience with it than I do, so maybe I'll give it a second chance, but on first glance, I could take it or leave it. Preferably the latter.

BTW, the Quikclot teabags are pretty cool. Just don't open the stuff on a windy day or with rotory wing nearby, else it wreaks havoc on your eyes.
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Old 03-10-2010, 17:22   #17
swatsurgeon
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Originally Posted by Mack View Post
Hey SwatSurgeon. Good question. A couple reasons I'd rather use kerlix...1-Kerlix is much easier to open with one hand (one hand holding pressure, other hand opening and applying gauze). 2-I didn't notice an improvement in acheiving hemostasis with the Combat Gauze vs Kerlix. Obviously, you have more experience with it than I do, so maybe I'll give it a second chance, but on first glance, I could take it or leave it. Preferably the latter.

BTW, the Quikclot teabags are pretty cool. Just don't open the stuff on a windy day or with rotory wing nearby, else it wreaks havoc on your eyes.
You are so right...even the tea bags have the 'dust' from the contents. The essential part of the equation is as you indicated, proper packing...it's a tamponade effect first and foremost. Most of the time the packing isn't adequate in most operators hands, hence the addition of a hemostatic agent to offer alittle extra....
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Old 03-22-2010, 08:36   #18
AndyBear
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We had combat gauze introduced to us on this most recent deployment. I would find myself reaching for kerlex out of familiarity before i did the thick, not easily op-enable, combat gauze package.

Another medic I know did use it one time and said he couldn't tell a big difference with it, but an over zealous brother had already placed a tourniquet on his leg and continued to return fire. I guess you can't really expect a Bravo to tell the difference between a mangled flesh wound and arterial bleed while he has someone to shoot at. They just get too excited to play with their toys.
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Old 04-24-2010, 10:55   #19
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My CLS provider used it on a 5.56mm exit wound, R bicep/shoulder 'blown out' with brisk bleeding from fascia, muscle, and what appeared to be a blood vessel, plus a 'gouged' bone that appeared to be the result of a 5.56 travelling along the shaft and bouncing out. Pt also sustained 5.56mm entry wound directly over T5 [my shot, strange angles] that severed his spinal cord and probably took out one or both great vessels. 16-17 y/o M. It worked fairly well- in all honesty, it was not a critical intervention at all. My care was a chest seal over the back wound and attempted rapid evacuation, secured airway and ventilations with BVM and Combitube. Considered performing a needle-chest decompression, but I had positive breath sounds on both lungs with bilateral movement. I ceased resuscitative efforts approximately 20 mins post-shooting and presumed him dead. My CLS guy nearly puked from the whole thing.

Even with limited bloodflow, the clotting properties were readily apparent- the IPs had difficulty removing the gauze from the wound. I was fairly impressed with it, although I wish that it was slightly easier to open.
I can see difficulties with some of the other available hemostatic agents, like the 'bag of hemcon' Quickclot sells on the civilian side. The Combat Gauze was fairly easy to work with. For this wound, the old powder would have been difficult.
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Old 04-26-2010, 02:07   #20
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Combat gauze

I have now used Combat gauze twice. Two patients, same roll. The first was an absolute minor head wound, but it would not stop bleeding even after pressure for 3-5 min. Applied about 1 ft. of combat Gauze and in three minutes the wound was clear and dry and sutured easily.

The second was last night. I was awakened after midnight to check a kid that while chopping wood with an ax, had missed and struck his right great toe area.
Boot removed, heavy bleeding from wound, toe still intact and functioning, but heavy bleeding. I used standard dressings and kerlix without complete success. Second round, Combat Gauze, deep into the wound cavity for three minutes and the bleeding stopped. * sutures later and the drunk cowboy is off to impress his girlfriend some more.

So far I have not use it on heavy arterial hemorrhages and cannot speak to that. I can say that in my limited applications it has performed better than the standard bandage and dressings available.


So now another question, and maybe this should be a post of it's own...? Once a QuikClot Combat Gauze is opened...if only partially used, what happens the the efficacy of the product if it is immediately resealed and kept dry? I did in fact reuse the product. It worked great both times. Any input on that?

Thanks in advance for your time.
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Last edited by CA_TacMedic; 04-26-2010 at 20:56.
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