Old 09-28-2007, 14:09   #16
The Reaper
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CSB:

Thanks.

Good to hear from one of our alumni who did both.

TR
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Old 09-28-2007, 15:31   #17
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I don't practice anything flashy or Perry Mason
Yah, in all my trials I keep waiting for someone in the gallery to jump up and say "I did it!" but they never do. I guess I'm just not that good, cause it happened in almost all of Mason's trials, not to mention ALL HIS CLIENTS WERE INNOCENT!

During my undergraduate tour G. Gordon Liddy spoke at our campus, and in between the chanting crowd of usual suspects one thing he said stuck with me. He said when he was taken into Federal custody they took away everything he had, even his wedding ring, but the one thing they could not take away was his education, and it stood him in good stead even in the big house.
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Old 09-28-2007, 17:25   #18
tom kelly
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NEVER QUIT

Get the Law Degree take and pass the Bar Exam.It is never a good sign to quit anything you thought worthwhile to start and invest time,effort and money in.After you get the results of the bar exam,take a look at the military options and make an intelligent and informed decision.Good Luck...Regards,tom kelly
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Old 09-28-2007, 17:51   #19
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I respectfully disagree with jatx about the utility of a legal education in the business world. Iíve worked for and with several successful consultants and business executives with exclusively legal training. Iím not a lawyer, and at this point Iím not even sure if I will practice law. Iím just trying to make it through night school, so perhaps Iím not yet ready to put my legal education in perspective. But now in my fourth year, one thing of which Iím sure is that Iíve been able to develop critical thinking and reasoning skills to a far deeper level than I ever did in b-school. That to me has been the most rewarding part of law school to date. I believe these skills will be valuable no matter where I go after I graduate, so I donít think Iíve been ďwasting daylight.Ē

Thereís nothing magical about the analytical tools taught in business school. These tools can be learned elsewhere. When I joined my first consulting firm after b-school, they immediately shipped me to their internal two-week, mini-MBA program. Many corporate giants like General Electric have well-regarded internal training programs, and McKinsey & Co. actively recruits at law and medical schools. They care much more about whether you are motivated to think and learn, not whether you can build a spreadsheet.

Besides, I learned far more about business after I got my MBA than when I was in b-school. After several years in management consulting, then the corporate world, and now owning a small business, Iíve learned that some of the toughest problems in business cannot be solved by applying the analytical tools taught in b-school.

As for the bar, I plan on sitting for the bar, both state and patent. If only because when I close my eyes I can clearly hear the first words out of the Deanís mouth on day one of orientation week. ďWe look forward to spending the next three to four years with you. But remember, you cannot call yourself a lawyer until youíve passed the bar.Ē
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Old 09-28-2007, 19:34   #20
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Other options

TR mentioned National Guard soldiers and their diverse civilian backgrounds. One option that hasnít been mentioned in this thread is, concurrently pursuing your law degree and Special Forces goals. The National Guard offers the Rep 63 program, which is essentially the Guard version of the 18X, this is one possibility. The ABA allows 6 years for a student to complete the requisite classes for a JD from an accredited school. (Otherwise your earned credits are lost and you have to start from scratch) You could take a leave of absence from school, go do your training and then finish the degree afterward between deployments. Another option would be to enlist as an 11B and leave for Basic and AIT during a law school summer break. Since this is your first taste of the Army, you can see if you like it and then switch to a NG SF unit and then pursue your goals from there if you so choose.

Just my .02
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Old 09-29-2007, 08:09   #21
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TR mentioned National Guard soldiers and their diverse civilian backgrounds. One option that hasnít been mentioned in this thread is, concurrently pursuing your law degree and Special Forces goals. The National Guard offers the Rep 63 program, which is essentially the Guard version of the 18X, this is one possibility. The ABA allows 6 years for a student to complete the requisite classes for a JD from an accredited school. (Otherwise your earned credits are lost and you have to start from scratch) You could take a leave of absence from school, go do your training and then finish the degree afterward between deployments. Another option would be to enlist as an 11B and leave for Basic and AIT during a law school summer break. Since this is your first taste of the Army, you can see if you like it and then switch to a NG SF unit and then pursue your goals from there if you so choose.

Just my .02
Given the demanding and competing requirements of SF, and law school, I do not see this as a realistic COA, particularly with the current Guard mobilization schedule.

You would need one to four years to complete your Rep 63 SF training, and then you could look forward to a rigorous deployment schedule as the Army tries to get their money back out of you.

At the same time, you have to complete 3-4 years of law school and pass the bar.

Not sure how you could juggle those glass balls without dropping one.

TR
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Old 09-29-2007, 09:58   #22
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I also disagree with jatx, although he is basing his opinion on what I am sure are accurate observations of some of his friends. It is absolutely true that there are lots of miserable lawyers "stuck" in big law firms. Once you start making that much money, you put the kids in private school, and the wife (or husband) gets use to having certain things, there is a lot of inertia keeping you where you are. And you can specialize in something that does not further prepare you for doing other things.

But a law degree is a very good general degree which will help you in other areas. I have many friends who are not practicing and who are glad they went to law school. The important thing is to know why you are doing what you're doing, and make decisions along the way that further your ultimate objective. For example, you shouldn't be taking trial advocacy classes unless you want to be a litigator, and you should be taking corporate finance and accounting for lawyers if you're interested in business. But these are decisions about what electives to take in the second two years of law school -- the base curriculum is good for everyone to have.
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Old 09-29-2007, 14:59   #23
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The important thing is to know why you are doing what you're doing, and make decisions along the way that further your ultimate objective.
Excellent advice.
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Old 10-22-2007, 18:50   #24
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Given the demanding and competing requirements of SF, and law school, I do not see this as a realistic COA, particularly with the current Guard mobilization schedule.

You would need one to four years to complete your Rep 63 SF training, and then you could look forward to a rigorous deployment schedule as the Army tries to get their money back out of you.

At the same time, you have to complete 3-4 years of law school and pass the bar.

Not sure how you could juggle those glass balls without dropping one.

TR
SHACK x 2!

I am currently facing this same situation. First and foremost is SF... Im also in the middle of finishing my International MBA and was/am still considering LS... not to mention my Arabic studies/requirements (International MBA thing). All plans are on hold for now and will be until I finish SF training... (I say that humbly ). I am slated for 18D (I say that humbly as well) and when all is said and done in the guard pipeline, Ill be done in 2.5 - 3 years. This is not even touching the surface with mobilizations. "Guard is good", but be realistic with the timeline.
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Old 10-22-2007, 22:40   #25
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Shack? Is he a lawyer and SF trooper as well? And I'd bet he's bigger than just XXL.
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Old 10-22-2007, 22:46   #26
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Shack? Is he a lawyer and SF trooper as well? And I'd bet he's bigger than just XXL.

That's an AF "Weapons on target" term.

Pat
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Old 10-23-2007, 08:35   #27
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That's an AF "Weapons on target" term.

Pat
Thanks Pat. Sorry for the improper placement of lingo.

Edited for spelling sadly

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Old 12-13-2007, 08:46   #28
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I had a fraternity brother who wanted to be a Navy Seal. He studied political science, took the LSAT in his fourth year, and graduated. Last I heard was that he went off to train with the Navy. I haven't heard from him since -maybe he made it or maybe he changed his mind - but he did what he was most passionate about first.

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Old 12-13-2007, 12:35   #29
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Get the education.
Don't ever quit anything you start.
Keep putting one foot in front of the other one and get that law degree.
No matter where you go or the situation you find yourself in, you will always have your education.



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Old 12-13-2007, 14:32   #30
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JD....some very good advice has been posted herein which will hopefully assist you in making the decision that is best for you. I will echo some of the points already made in that there are many non-traditional paths one can take with a law degree and license. I am a licensed attorney and have worked for over 10 years as general counsel for a law enforcement agency. I know many other attorneys who have enjoyed very rewarding careers working for federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. Law enforcement is just one career path, from many, down which one with a law degree can travel. Good luck with whatever path you choose.
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