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Old 09-14-2012, 20:11   #4
The Reaper
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Join Date: Jan 2004
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18C - Engineer Sergeant (011-18C30-C45)
Engineer Sergeants are experts in employing offensive/ defensive combat engineer capabilities to include demolitions, U.S. and foreign landmines, explosives and improvised munitions, construction, home made explosives, reconnaissance, and target analysis.
The construction module requires Soldiers to learn to read blueprints as well as design, and to construct a theater-of-operations building, as well as field fortifications to be used as fire bases while deployed on an SFODA.
Special Forces engineers are taught basic to advanced demolition skills that will enable them to destroy targets in non-electric and electric firing systems, with U.S., foreign and civilian demolition components.
Engineer sergeants plan, supervise, lead, perform and instruct all aspects of combat engineering, demolition operations and theater-of operations construction engineering in either English or their target language. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.
Prerequisites: Student must have successfully passed the Special Forces Orientation Course, SUT, Language and Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape before entering MOS training. Any variation from these prerequisites requires a waiver from the Commanding General, SWCS.
Purpose: To train selected Soldiers in the critical MOS and skill level (18C30) tasks and competencies required to perform the duties of a Special Forces engineer sergeant on a SF ODA.
Course Description: Basic military construction techniques and procedures; basic and intermediate demolitions; Special Forces Tactical Facilities, UXO/IED; target analysis/interdiction and mission planning; Warrior skills; combatives; plan and conduct training; and field-training exercises.

Module A
Demolitions: To provide students with baseline knowledge of explosives theory, their characteristics and common uses, formulasfor calculating various types of charges and standard methods of priming and placing these charges. Lesson plans include explosive entry techniques, demolition material, demolition safety, firing systems, calculation and placement of charges, expedient charges and range operations.

Module B
Special Operations Construction: To provide students with knowledge and training in the role of an SF engineer; blueprints (read/design); construction of a masonry wall; welding, concrete construction, types and sitings of obstacles, wire obstacles, fighting positions, bunkers and shelters, camp construction/fortification, heavy equipment operations (skid-steer loader, scraper, grader, scoop loader, utility tractor), electrical wiring, plumbing and logistical operations.

Module C
UXO/IED: To provide students with knowledge and skills in the construction, demolition and emplacement of special-purpose munitions and unexploded ordnance, including IEDs. Homemade expolosives.

Module D
Reconnaissance: To provide students with knowledge and training in target analysis/interdiction and mission planning.

Module E
Engineer Field Training Exercise: To complete the foreign internal defense scenario-based 18C SF engineer tasks.


18D - Medical Sergeant (011-18D30-C45)
Medical sergeants specialize in trauma management, infectious diseases, cardiac life support and surgical procedures, with a basic understanding of veterinary and dental medicine. Both general healthcare and emergency healthcare are stressed in training.
Medical sergeants provide emergency, routine and long-term medical care for detachment members and associated allied members and host-nation personnel. They establish field medical facilities to support unconventional-warfare operations. They provide veterinary care. They prepare the medical portion of area studies, briefbacks and operation plans and orders.
Soldiers selected for MOS 18D attend 250 days of advanced medical training. Additionally, they spend two months of the year on a trauma rotation in hospital emergency rooms. The medical-training phase includes a nationally accredited emergency medical technician paramedic program. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.


18E - Communications Sergeant (011-18E30-C45)
The Special Forces communications sergeant has to learn U.S. communication systems as well as those systems found throughout the world. He must incorporate this information and technology into his communications planning, and teach it to the other members of his ODA. Communications sergeants have a thorough grounding in communication basics, communications procedures, computer technology; assembly and systems applications.
They must understand communication theory — how to install, operate and maintain FM, AM, HF, VHF and UHF radio systems. They must be able to make communications in voice to data, and to read voice and data radio nets by utilizing computer systems and networks.
Communications sergeants are experts in sending and receiving critical messages that link the SFODA with its command and control elements. They are familiar with antenna theory, radio wave propagation and how to teach it to others. Communications sergeants prepare the communications portion of area studies, briefbacks and operation plans and orders. They can recruit, organize, train and advise or command indigenous combat forces up to company size.
Prerequisites: Student must have successfully passed the Special Forces Orientation Course, SUT and Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape before entering MOS training. Any variation from these prerequisites requires a waiver from the Commanding General, SWCS.
Purpose: To train selected Soldiers in the critical MOS and skill level (18E30) tasks and competencies required to perform the duties of an SF communications sergeant on an SFOD-A.
Course Description: The course provides training in computer applications, satellite radios and satellite and antenna theory and radio wave propagation. Soldiers will learn how to construct field-expedient antennas, employing communications procedures and techniques and communicate throughout the HF, VHF and UHF spectrums, all culminating with a field training exercise. The course goal is to develop a world-class SF Communicator capable of employing, accessing and familiar with SF, joint and interagency communications.

MODULE A — Course Orientation: Provides the students with the information of what is covered in the 18E Course, the student evaluation plan and conduct while attending the course.

MODULE B — Computer Applications: This module instructs Soldiers to become proficient in computer applications A+ training and NET+ training. The A+ training provides Soldiers the training necessary to troubleshoot and repair basic computer components, hard drives, power supplies, motherboards, video cards and other internal components of a computer. The Net+ training provides Soldiers the training necessary to network computers in a LAN and WAN and setting up servers and routers. Installing, operating and maintaining the SND-L and SOMPE-G. Students are postured at the end of this module for external certification in CompTIA+ network and security.

MODULE C — Communications Procedures: The module instructs the Soldiers on basic communications fundamentals such as basic radio theory, basic electricity, radio telephone procedures, signal-operating instructions, communication security, power applications and information operations/electronic warfare as they pertain to an SF communications sergeant.

MODULE D — Radios Common to the Army: Students receive instruction on the operation of radios and radio-secure systems common to Army units such as the AN/PRC-148, AN/PRC119F, AN/PYQ-10 simple key loader and the AN/CYZ-10 electronic transfer device.

MODULE E — Satellite Communications: Soldiers learn satellite theory, the use of satellite radios such as the AN/PSC-5C/D AN/PRC-117G and BGAN attenna and the radio’s modes of operation, demand assigned multiple access and point to point operations.
The Soldiers are also trained in the use of multiple computer applications such as VIASAT, PDA-184, and MoVer to install, operate and maintain satellite communications links.

MODULE F — Communications Planning: The Communications Planning Module instructs Soldiers in the matters of communications planning such as transmission site selection, the duties and responsibilities of the SF communications sergeant, signal support in the Special Forces group, MDMP, mission planning and preparing a signal annex to an operations order as it pertains to his duties and responsibilities.

MODULE G — High Frequency Communications: The module instructs Soldiers in the use of the high frequency (HF) radio spectrum to communicate, such as training in antenna theory and radio wave propagation, the calculation of length to determine how to make HF antennas for short, medium and long-range communications. The operation and troubleshooting of the AN/PRC-137 special mission radio set (SMRS) and AN/PRC-150 are also taught.

MODULE I — Field Performance: This module measures the Soldiers ability through testing and grading to measure proficiency in the use and techniques of the equipment and procedures taught throughout the SF Communications Sergeant Course. The Soldiers must achieve a passing grade to become qualified.
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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

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