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Old 04-02-2006, 15:31   #2
The Reaper
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Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Free Pineland
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Pipeline Changes

The following is the most current info available about the SF Pipeline.

If this changes, and it probably has, you should still be able to get the latest skinny by doing a little independent research.

The sequence of the SFQC is frequently evolving.

The most current data is here.

http://www.soc.mil/swcs/_pdf/AcademicHandbook.pdf

Good luck.

TR

Special Forces Preparatory Course (SFPC)
Course Number: 011-F82 Clearance:
Class Size: 120 Iterations: 10 per year Course Duration: 3 Weeks 4 Days
See ATTRS for course dates
Scope: This 19-day performance-oriented course includes physical conditioning, map reading and land navgation instruction; land-navigation practical exercises and common-task training.
Course Description: To prepare and condition 18X and REP-63 (National Guard) Soldiers to attend Special Forces Assessment and Selection course and the follow-on Special Forces Qualification Course.

Special Forces Assessment and Selection (SFAS)
Course Number: 2E-F129/011-F44 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: 350 Iterations: 10 per year Course Duration: 4 Weeks 4 Days
See ATTRS for course dates
Prerequisites: N/A
Scope: This 19-day performance-oriented course includes psychological assessments, intellectual assessments, land-navigation assessments, and team trek events.
Course Description: Assess each Special Forces candidate for trainability and suitability to attend the Special Forces Qualification Course. Utilizing a whole-man approach, each individual is assessed based on the core attributes required for service in ARSOF and under the character attributes as defined in USAREC Pamphlet 610-25. Assessments are made throughout the course, which consists of physical fitness/confidence events, intelligence/psychological exams/ assessments, land navigation assessments and team trek events.

Special Forces Qualification Course (SFQC)
Soldiers selected to attend the SFQC will PCS to Fort Bragg, N.C., where they will begin the rigorous training of the SFQC. The course focuses on core tactical competencies, MOS skills, survival and language and culture skills. Upon completion of the SFQC, Soldiers join the Special Forces brotherhood, earn the right to wear the Special Forces tab and don the highly coveted Green Beret.
Course Description: The course consists of six sequential phases of training:

SFQC Phase I - Course Orientation and History (7 weeks)
Course Number: 2E-F253/011-F95 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: 180 Iterations: 8 per year Course Duration: 51-57 Weeks
See ATTRS for course dates 90 Weeks for 18D students
Course Description: : Phase 1 of the SFQC is the SF Orientation Course, a seven-week introduction to SF. Dubbed the Orientation and History module, the course falls under the auspices of the 4th Battalion, 1st Special Warfare Training Group (Airborne).
The course is separated into six modules:

Module A
Introduction to Unconventional Warfare. This phase of training will expose the students to the overall learning objectives and outcomes of the SFQC, train them in tactical geurrilla warfare, and most importantly, provide them the operational and strategic context under which they will train for the remainder of the SFQC. Under the supervision of the cadre in Robin Sage and mentorship of the “G” chiefs, the students will complete this phase with a firm understanding of what will be expected of them throughout the remainder of the SFQC and the importance of UW in the Special Forces mission. This is an introduction to the students to UW at the beginning of the SFQC through their participation in Robin Sage as “Gs”.

Module B
Introduction to Special Forces. To provide the Soldiers an understanding of Special Forces, its history, organization, attributes and the core tasks that relate to their mission. Lessons include SFODA and SFODB numbering convention, command and control architecture, joint special-operations area, duties and responsibilities of each MOS, SF planning and organization, core mission and tasks, SOF physical fitness and nutrition. The training is to prepare our future Special Forces Soldier forwhat is expected of him and the standards that he must acquire to graduate the SFQC and be a member of the brotherhood and regiment.

Module C
Introduction to Special Forces. To provide the Soldiers an understanding of Special Forces, its history, organization, attributes and the core tasks that relate to their mission. Lessons include SFODA and SFODB numbering convention, command and control architecture, joint special-operations area, duties and responsibilities of each MOS, SF planning and organization, core mission and tasks, SOF physical fitness and nutrition. The training is to prepare our future Special Forces Soldier for what is expected of him and the standards that he must acquire to graduate the SFQC and be a member of the brotherhood and regiment.

Module D
Airborne Operations and Refresher. This module allows the Soldier to maintain his jump proficiency and prepare for the training he will encounter throughout the SFQC.

Module E
Special Forces Planning. This module provides the Soldiers an understanding of the Special Forces Mission Planning process. The Soldiers are given classes on the Military Decision Making Process followed by a practical exercise that reinforces the training.

Module F
Operational Culture and Regional Analysis: The purpose of this instructional module is to give students a foundational understanding of the battlespace including: operational culture and a systems’ analysis of an area. The lessons include a view of one’s own cultural lenses, leading to an understanding of the perspective of others as well as the use of PMESII-PT system of regional analysis to deduce the capabilities, people and environment of a given area. The Pineland Area Study will be used as the basis for analysis allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the training environment.

SFQC Phase II, Language and Culture
Course Number: 2E-F253/011-F95 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: Iterations: per year Course Duration: 18-24 Weeks
See ATTRS for course dates
Course Description: Phase 2 of the SFQC focuses on language and culture. During Phase 2, Soldiers receive basic special-operations language training in the language assigned to them at the completion of Special Forces Assessment and Selection. Languages are broken into two categories based on their degree of difficulty. Soldiers who are assigned a Category I or II language will be enrolled in an 18-week language program, while Soldiers who are assigned a Category III or IV language will attend 24 weeks of language training.

Students receive instruction in three basic language skills: speaking, participatory listening and reading (limited). The following areas of emphasis are covered during the training: overview of physical and social systems, economics, politics and security, infrastructure and technology information, culture and regional studies. Language instruction focuses on functional application geared toward mission-related tasks, enhanced rapport building techniques, cultural mitigation strategies, interpreting and control of interpreter methods. Also during Phase 2, a progressive PT program is started in order to prepare for Phase 3.

To successfully complete Phase 2, Soldiers must achieve a minimum of 1/1 Listening and Speaking as measured by the two-skill Oral Proficiency Interview.

SFQC Phase III, Small Unit Tactics (SUT)
Course Number: 2E-F254/011-F96 Clearance: Interim Secret
Class Size: 180 Iterations: 8 per year Course Duration: 12 Weeks 4 Days
See ATTRS for course dates
Course Description: Small Unit Tactics is the third phase in the qualification course. The 13-week program provides Soldiers in the SFQC the apprentice-level tactical combat skills required to successfully operate on an SFOD-A.
Students will master the following tactical skills: advanced marksmanship; small-unit tactics; SF common tasks; urban operations; mission analysis; advanced special operations level 1; sensitive-site exploitation; military-decision making process.

At the end of Phase 3, Soldiers will enroll in SERE Level C, where they will receive intensive training in support of the Code of Conduct. Training includes survival field craft skills, techniques of evasion, resistance to exploitation and resolution skills in all types of environments. Students will participate in a survival and evasion field-training exercise and in a resistance-training laboratory. The course spans three weeks with three phases of instruction. The first phase lasts approximately 10 days of academic instruction on the Code of Conduct and in SERE techniques that incorporate both classroom training and hands-on field craft.

The second phase is a five-day field training exercise in which the students practice their survival and evasion skills by procuring food and water, constructing evasion fires and shelters and evading tracker dogs and aggressor forces over long distances. The final phase takes place in the resistance-training laboratory, where students are tested on their individual and collective abilities to resist interrogation and exploitation and to properly apply the six articles of the Code of Conduct in a realistic captivity scenario.
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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." - President Theodore Roosevelt, 1910

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