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-   -   UNC To Train Special Forces Vets As Physician Assistants (http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=40167)

2018commo 12-07-2012 11:10

I can think of a couple of SF Medics currently "residing" at Walter Reed, who should be all over this...

MILON 12-07-2012 15:48

Eagle5US and Beef:

Thank you for the well wishes! Its quite a process, but very well worth the effort!

I actually submitted applications to 13 programs, including IPAP, and tried to vary it up between types of schools. Some were probably long shots, but I figured I didnt know what "flavor" they are looking for, so why not?

As it stands right now, I accepted a spot at NOVA Southeastern-Fort Myers for the June class. That basically gave me some insurance while I await responses from other programs. I literally just received word today that I am 2nd on the waitlist for the April IPAP class. Also, I have an interview at Emory University next month.

The IPAP result was kind of a bummer, I have to admit. However, I am now awaiting confirmation from the recuriter that I can re-apply next round (maybe someone here would know?) and I'll give it one more shot.

Milon

Eagle5US 12-07-2012 15:53

2nd on the wait list is actually very good. With folks deploying, pregnancies, "accepted folks" turning out to be overweight or getting in trouble prior to class starting and other deferrments...it is not unusual for wait listed folks to get in.

Study hard, best of luck.

MILON 12-07-2012 16:01

Thanks Eagle5US....thats a better perspective than the recruiter gave. :cool:

Beef 12-07-2012 19:10

Milon, this is an absolute truth: I was 2nd on the Alternate list at the UAB Nurse Anesthesia Program in May of 1988. Most people applied to multiple sites.( UAB was my first choice. ) Anyway, ONE other person got into another program. They called the first alternate. No answer. They called me. I was at home asleep, since I had worked the night shift the night before, so I answered. It'll work out for you, trust me..... And I'm no recruiter!

MILON 12-07-2012 21:45

Beef, VERY encouraging words and also much appreciated! I've planned for this contingency all along and will follow through with the plan until the end. I am still optimistic about my chances at IPAP and regardless of what happens there, I will be well into a program learning medicine by this time next year.

Thanks again!

Milon

LeapingGnome 08-08-2013 11:23

Has anyone looked into this, or heard more about it recently?

GrumpyMedic 08-08-2013 18:34

Undergrad degree programs
 
Someone asked about undergraduate and applied credits for 18Ds. Western Carolina University has two Emergency Medical Care programs (Management, B.A. and Pre-Med, B.S). WCU gave me 58 semester hours of credit for being a current (at the time) 18D. About 90% of the coursework can be completed online with the exception of the chemistry and physics courses which most Medical Schools require be taken face to face anyway. The program is only open to Paramedics and current/former SF Medics.
Just thought I'd throw that little tidbit out there....

Aequitas 05-11-2014 07:22

Just Finished
 
Completed degree requirements for my BS in Emergency Medical Care! I walked across the stage yesterday at Western Carolina University graduating from college after starting WAY back in 2000. It was a long road that took me through three universities and one community college...I'm glad I've finally finished! If anyone needs help with the 18D degree through WCU, I'm here to help you in any way I can.

Cheers.

Quote:

Originally Posted by GrumpyMedic (Post 518436)
Someone asked about undergraduate and applied credits for 18Ds. Western Carolina University has two Emergency Medical Care programs (Management, B.A. and Pre-Med, B.S). WCU gave me 58 semester hours of credit for being a current (at the time) 18D. About 90% of the coursework can be completed online with the exception of the chemistry and physics courses which most Medical Schools require be taken face to face anyway. The program is only open to Paramedics and current/former SF Medics.
Just thought I'd throw that little tidbit out there....


Guy 05-11-2014 08:37

Aequitas
 
Congrats mate!!!!

SFgrunt 05-12-2014 14:01

This really didn't sound any different than what most PA programs do. The biggest obstacle to my fellow medics on the teams was they didn't have a Bachelor's degree so applying to most PA programs was automatically out of the question. Is this NC program going to be any different?

Eagle5US 05-12-2014 15:07

Quote:

Originally Posted by SFgrunt (Post 550511)
This really didn't sound any different than what most PA programs do. The biggest obstacle to my fellow medics on the teams was they didn't have a Bachelor's degree so applying to most PA programs was automatically out of the question. Is this NC program going to be any different?

Most programs remain Bachelor Degree producing programs with the trend in transition to eventually all being Masters programs. So them not already having a Bachelors would not be disqualifying.
You may be thinking of them not having an Associates degree.

SFgrunt 05-23-2014 15:48

It's my understanding that the majority are Master's programs requiring a Bachelor's degree to enter. There are still some remaining Bachelor's or Certificate programs out there, but by 2020 they will all need to be Master's programs or go bye bye. Again, that's my understanding, I may be wrong.

Here's one quick link I found from a quick Google search:

http://mdjourney.com/index-of-all-ph...nized-by-state

Eagle5US 05-24-2014 06:53

By 2020 that is correct...Master's will be the "norm".

With more than 350 programs nationwide, the larger university programs have already made the transition. Many of the smaller, state / community based schools are holding back on the requirement in order to encourage enrollment in their programs.

There was a lecture on this "trend" at a conference I attended in November last year; basically how we were schooling ourselves out of a salary by flooding the market, and how the trend will eventually progress to a doctoral requirement over the next 25years...thus discouraging participation in the career field with a "pay / education disparity".

After being a PA for 15yrs, I can easily see where this could be the case. Stuff to think about....

Beef 05-24-2014 15:29

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eagle5US (Post 551774)
By 2020 that is correct...Master's will be the "norm".

With more than 350 programs nationwide, the larger university programs have already made the transition. Many of the smaller, state / community based schools are holding back on the requirement in order to encourage enrollment in their programs.

There was a lecture on this "trend" at a conference I attended in November last year; basically how we were schooling ourselves out of a salary by flooding the market, and how the trend will eventually progress to a doctoral requirement over the next 25years...thus discouraging participation in the career field with a "pay / education disparity".

After being a PA for 15yrs, I can easily see where this could be the case. Stuff to think about....

Eagle, let me show you the future as I know it. The AANA Council on Accreditation has allowed CRNA programs to be opened on every street corner, particularly in the Southeast. And has allowed existing programs to increase the number of grads that they crank out annually by multiples of 2-4. In my state, the market is so flooded that new grads are working as regular RNs in PACU and ICU just like they did before going to CRNA school. Except they now owe $140-200K in student loans.

As of this past Aug., all the CRNA programs have been mandated by the AANA to become doctoral programs, nine months longer and cost more. Yet the difference between the phD and MS and BS programs strictly lie in... doing research papers. Not clinical requirements. Indeed, the newer grads are even less clinically competent than prior grads due to increased competition for cases in the clinical sites.

Driving down salaries??? I have received a $60,000 a year pay cut in two years and make what a new grad does , because if I won't a new grad will. And I'm off to ICU.

Who benefits from this trend to puppy mills? The AANA, universities and program directors. Who loses? CRNAs across the board and patients, who are getting less competent new grads.

Am I bitter? F**k yeah!


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