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Fud116 05-04-2010 20:16

As far as I know, partial (half) squats don't involve the glutes and hamstrings as much as full squats do. I've always been told to do full squats, at least to parallel.

Just my .02 Cents

Surgicalcric 05-04-2010 20:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fud116 (Post 328983)
As far as I know, partial (half) squats don't involve the glutes and hamstrings as much as full squats do. I've always been told to do full squats, at least to parallel...

It was a rhetorical question.

Sean: You have a PM.

Crip

forward 05-04-2010 20:39

Comment Deleted.

Blitzzz (RIP) 05-04-2010 21:56

Amazing...Done well.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by forward (Post 328975)
Week 6 numbers from today's Blitz:

Exercise 1RM Start WT RD 1 RD 2 RD 3 Goal Reps
Military Press 225 105 92 97 96 92
Half Squat 300 172.5 97 107 107 96
Lat Pull 270 128 64 66 65 64
Calf Raises 300 140 126 132 131 128
Seated Row 150 85 87 90 88 88
Shrugs 180 80 144 150 145 144

V/r,

Forward

Forward, excellent, You know which exercises are ready to bump up and which ones need another day.

Bump: Military press, Half squats, Lat pulls,and shrugs.
another day with Calf Raises and Seated Rows. Your doing great. DAve

Blitzzz (RIP) 05-04-2010 22:03

Correction to this..
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fud116 (Post 328983)
As far as I know, partial (half) squats don't involve the glutes and hamstrings as much as full squats do. I've always been told to do full squats, at least to parallel.

Just my .02 Cents

Squats, full or half do not exercise Hamstrings or Calves.
Calves are exercised with Heel raises (going up on tip toes) Best from a prestretched position Dorsiflexed to Plantar flexed.
Hamstrings are done with Hamstring curls.
Sean enjoy your PM.

Irishsquid 05-04-2010 22:45

Blitz:

I work out at Golds gym (got a discount there, through my wife's work)

Trying to do the Blitz protocol, I find myself often having to wait for the next machine to be free...thus ruining my interval timing. How much is this going to impact my workout?

Basically, it's changing my workout from "Blitz," to a standard "Ultra High Repetition," workout. I'm still seeing a lot of benefit, but just curious as to whether or not I would be seeing faster/better gains if able to stick more closely to the intervals...

Thanks, in advance.

Blitzzz (RIP) 05-04-2010 23:26

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irishsquid (Post 329008)
Blitz:

I work out at Golds gym (got a discount there, through my wife's work)

Trying to do the Blitz protocol, I find myself often having to wait for the next machine to be free...thus ruining my interval timing. How much is this going to impact my workout?

Basically, it's changing my workout from "Blitz," to a standard "Ultra High Repetition," workout. I'm still seeing a lot of benefit, but just curious as to whether or not I would be seeing faster/better gains if able to stick more closely to the intervals...

Thanks, in advance.

What is Ultra high consist of?

You may be able to Blitz in the gym buy rotating exercises within the circuit as a machine is available.

A couple of minutes is ok...about 5 or 6. When we did three guys at once each one was having about 5 min between exercises

Irishsquid 05-04-2010 23:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blitzzz (Post 329009)
What is Ultra high consist of?

You may be able to Blitz in the gym buy rotating exercises within the circuit as a machine is available.

A couple of minutes is ok...about 5 or 6. When we did three guys at once each one was having about 5 min between exercises

When I used to do UHR workouts, I think it was defined as 50+ reps in a set...

As for my intervals, I'm usually waiting 2-5 minutes between exercises.

MILON 05-05-2010 15:44

Squats
 
I am curious what information Blitz and Surgicalcric have regarding squating. Would either of you mind PMing or just posting the information you have sent to Sean.

Thanks in advance.

Milon

Blitzzz (RIP) 05-05-2010 16:02

I'll post on Squats
 
.... when I know what you're looking for. In what vane is this question, safety, injury, strength...?

MILON 05-06-2010 08:50

Blitzzz,

Well, I think effectiveness of the squat as an exercise in regards to increasing strength is obvious. Add resistance / reps, you get stronger. The debate seems to come in when you consider the degree of depth the movement should be performed. I was curious of your opinion on how deep you advise your clients to go and, in your years experience, what kind of injury patterns you have seen with the squat. I know coaches and trainers who preach "ass in the grass", 90 degrees, etc, to some who down right exclude the squat.

Just wanted to pick your brain, but I realize this is getting away from your blitzzz system a bit. I dont wish to debate anything, just wanted to hear your thoughts.

Thanks,

Milon

Blitzzz (RIP) 05-06-2010 10:46

My note ohm Squats.
 
First of all the major strength of a muscle bundle is in the middle 60% with the weakest portions at the ends. You can notice how folks will cheat a little to get a curls started or to push up out of a squat to gain momentum for the lift.
That's why many will do Isotonic squats with 4 second movements through range.

I have seen way too many knees injured through "MaX" weight squats. Remember the more resistance through a joint the more compressed it becomes thus cartilage damage and tendonitis and ligament strains.
By building too much muscle strength first, the tendon and ligaments don't have sufficient time too adjust to the new power running through them and this causes tendonitis and ligament strains and ruptures.
If I'm working with a person who cannot rise from a deep squat then I start them doing Blitz type reps on a total gym set at the lowest position the person can lift from. the reps they do are from deep (ass on heels) to a 90Degree seated position.

When they're stronger then they can elevate the TG until they are at the 100% level. Then I start them doing "Full" squats.
The thigh muscle are doing the extension of the knee joint and are weakest in the end range of the squat. Strengthen that end first without damage to the cartilage.
remember , in all the Blitz exercising, the sinovial fluid movement is greatly enhanced. Great for repair and lug of movement.
Frankly it is hard to achieve the heavier squat weights without first developing the initial movement strength.


Dave

Surgicalcric 05-06-2010 18:13

Quote:

Originally Posted by MILON (Post 329141)
I am curious what information Blitz and Surgicalcric have regarding squating. Would either of you mind PMing or just posting the information you have sent to Sean.

Thanks in advance.

Milon

We talking front squats or traditional (back) squats?

In either position, I love squats and believe them to be the best single exercise(s) for building quad strength there is. They are also a great test of core strength, especially the front squat. The squat is also one of the most dangerous lifts and requires patience and good coaching to learn them properly.

As for depth of the squat and weight, when lifting heavy (1-3 rep max) I recommend people go no lower than 90 degrees. Some people use a chair or box, I have found a stability ball works great. On lighter sets I squat until my heels lift, with back squats; with the front squat that isnt an issue. As my Brother said, its the end of the muscle which are the weakest and one must bet past that strong part to build strength in the ends.

HTH,

Crip

abc_123 05-06-2010 20:37

Quote:

Originally Posted by Surgicalcric (Post 329402)
We talking front squats or traditional (back) squats?

In either position, I love squats and believe them to be the best single exercise(s) for building quad strength there is. They are also a great test of core strength, especially the front squat. The squat is also one of the most dangerous lifts and requires patience and good coaching to learn them properly.

As for depth of the squat and weight, when lifting heavy (1-3 rep max) I recommend people go no lower than 90 degrees. Some people use a chair or box, I have found a stability ball works great. On lighter sets I squat until my heels lift, with back squats; with the front squat that isnt an issue. As my Brother said, its the end of the muscle which are the weakest and one must bet past that strong part to build strength in the ends.

HTH,

Crip


Crip,
I'd say that depends on what you mean by "danger".

I'd bet that the number of people that have been killed doing squats is probably around zero. One can't say the same for the perennial favorite.. barbell bench presses.

abc

Surgicalcric 05-07-2010 04:13

Quote:

Originally Posted by abc_123 (Post 329421)
Crip,
I'd say that depends on what you mean by "danger"...

Danger of serious injury is what I was referring to: back/neck disc herniation's, hip dislocations and labrum tears, knee dislocations and meniscus issues or ligament tears, etc. I suppose I should have been a lil more specific.

The barbell bench is, as you mention, a dangerous lift as well and a spotter should be utilized anytime lifting for 1-3 rep max/max effort to minimize the chances of asphyxiation from the bar falling on the chest or trachea due to a structural failure (tendons, ligaments) or muscle fatigue/failure or tear.

That said I wouldnt leave these lifts or any of the major free weight barbell lifts out of any routine or training plan for the athlete or soldier serious about building strength.

Crip


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