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-   -   18th Century Cooking Channel Youtube (http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53417)

7624U 03-09-2018 19:04

18th Century Cooking Channel Youtube
 
Have been watching this for a few days some interesting cooking knowledge over open fires, and oven making. :munchin

https://www.*******.com/user/jastownsendandson

Team Sergeant 03-09-2018 20:51

Quote:

Originally Posted by 7624U (Post 641178)
Have been watching this for a few days some interesting cooking knowledge over open fires, and oven making. :munchin

https://www.*******.com/user/jastownsendandson




While our ancestors left us with fine art and music they did not leave us with a comprehensive “cookbook” until around 1907.

Hard to believe huh, but it’s true. Auguste Escoffier wrote the very first “comprehensive” cookbook in modern history.

Many “chefs” have tried to replicate dishes from history, and most not the greatest results.

Recipes from any earlier, are just a guess.

Those recipes you’re watching are most likely a SWAG on cooking methods, techniques and ingredients, nothing more and nothing less.

But they generate money……..

7624U 03-10-2018 05:02

Quote:

Originally Posted by Team Sergeant (Post 641181)

Hard to believe huh, but it’s true. Auguste Escoffier wrote the very first “comprehensive” cookbook in modern history.

Many “chefs” have tried to replicate dishes from history, and most not the greatest results.

Recipes from any earlier, are just a guess.

Those recipes you’re watching are most likely a SWAG on cooking methods, techniques and ingredients, nothing more and nothing less.

But they generate money……..

Chef cooking in a modern kitchen where the recipe has to be exact every-time because your cooking for a lot of people I buy what your saying about "comprehensive" cookbook being in 1907.

Other cookbooks have been written earlier then that date. googled in a few sec's. https://theculturetrip.com/europe/ar...-in-the-world/

My intent was not the recipe's but the open fire style of cooking showing that when SHTF. We don't have to suffer with beans and rice everyday over a fire lol.

Jeff even you have to agree there is more than one way to clear a room or a building :D end results are what matter.
Its free to watch hes not getting money from me other then clicks.

Pete 03-10-2018 05:13

I've been watching him for years.

Some of the recipes are a bit complicated but use simple ingredients.

Loved the one where he made a pot out of dough and cooked meat in it. Also the baked bean one cooked in the ground.

Pete 03-10-2018 06:31

If you cruise around in his clips you will find some interesting subjects related to "off the grid" "survival" stuff. This clip of preserving eggs is interesting.

https://www.*******.com/watch?v=yUYgguMz1qI

As to cook books, they go back a long ways. During the Civil War many news papers ran cooking columns about using what you had - especially in the south.

PSM 03-10-2018 13:39

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pete (Post 641186)
This clip of preserving eggs is interesting.

https://www.*******.com/watch?v=yUYgguMz1qI

When my wife and I were researching our planned blue-water retirement she found an article in which one cruising couple coated their eggs with petroleum jelly. We decided that shortening would be safer and better. The slaked lime sounds excellent but carrying an item on a small sailboat that has limited use is a non-starter. Of course, unless disaster hit, when sailing offshore you're not at sea more than a couple of weeks at a time anyway.

As for "cookbooks", on my mother's side, they were mostly just family recipes passed down from one generation to the next. Given that her mother's line has been traced back to the Mayflower, it's possible that some recipe for something came from that period. But it would have been lost when my grandmother died since my mother relied on "modern" cookbooks.

Team Sergeant 03-11-2018 16:47

I'm not here to argue cook books. What I am saying is that Escoffier was the first to produce a cookbook of recipes and techniques that started the world of modern cuisine. The rest are just cookbooks/recipes scattered around the world.

Most of the "old" cookbooks are really menus of what royalty dined on, we know what they ate but have little information on how or the ingredients involved.

And if we were to delve into the culinary world, you'll find more "frauds" there than even green beret/seal frauds....... ;)

Pete 03-11-2018 19:40

Well, he mentions names, dates and the name of the book with recipes. If it's a book with recipes I guess you could call it a cook book.

The earliest year I remember of the top of my head was 1736.

Golf1echo 03-12-2018 09:38

I enjoy his perspective,field cooking and preparation is uncommon in todays modern world.

Another excellent recipe book is Horace Kephart's " Camp Cookery " practical camping recipes for the field and prep of game.

https://books.google.com/books/about...page&q&f=false

... if interested do yourself a favor and order his " Camping and Woodcraft " which has the cooking book inserted between his volume one and two, it is one of the best references I have run into for general knowledge of a time gone by.

Team Sergeant 03-12-2018 14:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by Golf1echo (Post 641236)
I enjoy his perspective,field cooking and preparation is uncommon in todays modern world.

Another excellent recipe book is Horace Kephart's " Camp Cookery " practical camping recipes for the field and prep of game.

https://books.google.com/books/about...page&q&f=false

... if interested do yourself a favor and order his " Camping and Woodcraft " which has the cooking book inserted between his volume one and two, it is one of the best references I have run into for general knowledge of a time gone by.

This fellow is not "camping", not with what he writes about carrying. You'd need a wagon to load all his products and cooking gear. And Lyonnaise Potatoes, is French culinary cuisine........

Golf1echo 03-12-2018 17:50

Quote:

Originally Posted by Team Sergeant (Post 641245)
This fellow is not "camping", not with what he writes about carrying. You'd need a wagon to load all his products and cooking gear. And Lyonnaise Potatoes, is French culinary cuisine........

Good catch Team Sergeant, Horace wrote for Field and Steam in the early 1900's ...he had been a librarian and was a bit of a mess. What Horace did was illuminate the wilds of Western North Carolina which for the most part was a closed off chapter of American migration. His AO was Deep Creek in the Bryson City area. He was eventually accepted by the mountaineers who seldom opened up to outsiders. He had money from his articles which allowed him resources to explore the cultural aspects of life in the wilds, he stayed in Summer camps he built, occasionally was a caretaker in small mill cabins and at times lived briefly in Bryson City itself. At the time there were few wagon roads but paths, mule trails and the use of sledges were more typical due to the terrain and vegetation. To some degree, through his articles, perhaps an analogy might be a bit of a Martha Stewart type or you tuber in today's context. What he presented of the mountain culture was the genuine article... A place and time locked in the past due to isolation and culture.

He and his writings are credited with spurring awareness of some horrendous logging and mining practices by big industry which lead to the creation of the Smokey Mountain National Park. He is both celebrated and reviled for these efforts locally.

Edit: Nessmuck/ George Washington Sears is another similar author from a slightly earlier time, he has some intriguing articles worth the read.

Librarian- a compiler of information, to include knowledge of the classics for expanded context.

Pete 03-13-2018 03:14

Cook Books?
 
Here are some of the oldest cook books - 1700 BC to 1390 AD

https://theculturetrip.com/europe/ar...-in-the-world/

1300 AD to 1400 AD seems to have really kicked off cook books.

Golf1echo 03-16-2018 09:14

Came across another interesting book on cooking from our early American experience.

" The Kentucky Housewife " 1839

http://www.ebooksdownloads.xyz/searc...ucky-housewife


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